IoT, AR, VR to beyond with 5G - Connected World

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For this column let's consider how IoT (Internet of Things) technologies and 5G will impact medicine and healthcare. Just for a moment I think it's really important to imagine what our society will look like when we imagine real possibilities for technology beyond what we ever dreamed possible. From teaching empathy to med students to enabling telemedicine and telesurgery, the impact of technologies like AR (augmented reality), VR (virtual reality), AI (artificial intelligence), wearables, and robotics in medicine and healthcare are wide ranging and far reaching. With 5G, the possibilities seem even more endless. There are so many exciting applications of IoT technologies in the medical field.


IoT, AR, VR to beyond with 5G - Connected World

#artificialintelligence

For this column let's consider how IoT (Internet of Things) technologies and 5G will impact medicine and healthcare. Just for a moment I think it's really important to imagine what our society will look like when we imagine real possibilities for technology beyond what we ever dreamed possible. From teaching empathy to med students to enabling telemedicine and telesurgery, the impact of technologies like AR (augmented reality), VR (virtual reality), AI (artificial intelligence), wearables, and robotics in medicine and healthcare are wide ranging and far reaching. With 5G, the possibilities seem even more endless. There are so many exciting applications of IoT technologies in the medical field.


Artificial intelligence is paving the way for less invasive surgical training The McGill Tribune

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Repeated practice is necessary to achieve mastery, which is no exception for surgical residents who often train directly on patients for four to six years. However, in this hands-on learning environment, even a minor mistake can be serious. To protect against such fatalities, a McGill research team constructed a solution. "The implementation of competency-based surgical education, along with advances in virtual reality, has resulted in the development and utilization of virtual reality-based surgical simulators," Rolando Del Maestro, professor emeritus in neuro-oncology at McGill, said in an interview with The McGill Tribune. The Neurosurgical Stimulation and Artificial Intelligence Learning Centre recently published a study in JAMA Network Open.


HoloLens, MD: Why this medical school will teach doctors anatomy with Microsoft's augmented reality, not cadavers

ZDNet

HoloLens wearers see a representation of a human body in 3D, and can navigate through the layers of skin, muscle, blood vessels, and organs to the skeleton below. Every doctor, no matter how long they've been out of medical school, will remember the first time they walked into a dissection lab. They'll remember the smell of the embalming fluid, the feeling of peeling back the cover to reveal the cadaver underneath, and being handed a scalpel and asked to make their first incision. It's a rite of passage for many aspiring doctors: some will cry or faint at the sight of the cadaver, some will understand for the first time how different systems work together, or that medicine goes hand in hand with mortality, and all will feel profoundly grateful to the person whose donated body lies in front of them. Dissection labs are often cramped, with too many students per cadaver to afford everyone a good view.


This medical pioneer trains digital doctors with AR and VR

ZDNet

Dr. Shafi Ahmed is a practicing cancer surgeon who specializes in laparoscopic, or keyhole, colorectal surgery. It's worth noting that the Medical College of St Bartholomew's Hospital (the oldest remaining hospital in the UK) was founded in 1123 and has provided medical education since that date. Dr. Ahmed is also co-founder and Chief Medical Officer of Medical Realities, a company that uses virtual reality and other immersive technologies to "solve big problems in surgical training." And, crucially, he is a foremost proponent of using virtual reality for medical education. Given this background, it was a no-brainer for me to invite Dr. Ahmed to episode 281 of the CXOTalk series of conversations with the world's top innovators.