Hypersuit VR simulator uses a movable 'exoskeleton' for virtual flight

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A virtual reality exoskeleton could soon allow you to'explore breathtaking universes' without ever leaving your home. The Hypersuit, demonstrated at the CES Unveiled event in Las Vegas on Tuesday, is a full-body immersive VR simulator that relies on arm movements to control the user's'flight.' It allows for a number of different experiences, from astronaut to deep-sea diver, and even has a fan blowing at different air speeds depending on the virtual setting. A virtual reality exoskeleton could soon allow you to'explore breathtaking universes' without ever leaving your home. The Hypersuit is an exoskeleton that uses arm movements to control direction in the virtual setting.


Cheaper than a cadaver: Haptic flight simulator puts surgeons in the virtual cutting room

ZDNet

London-based FundamentalVR, which makes simulation technology for medical training, is rolling out a new surgical flight simulator. Employing advanced haptics to mimic the real-life sensations of multiple surgical tools, the company is hoping the training experience feels less like a game and more like a real-life surgical scenario. This is the first time I've come across a company boasting that its product is cheaper than a dead body. According to a FundamentalVR spokesperson, the combination of low cost off-the-shelf hardware and plug-and-play simplicity brings the price point for the simulation platform under that of a training cadaver. Presumably you can get quite a bit more use out of the VR solution, as well.


Machine learning-guided virtual reality simulators can be powerful tools in surgeon training

#artificialintelligence

Machine learning-guided virtual reality simulators can help neurosurgeons develop the skills they need before they step in the operating room, according to a new study. Research from the Neurosurgical Simulation and Artificial Intelligence Learning Centre at The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital) and McGill University shows that machine learning algorithms can accurately assess the capabilities of neurosurgeons during virtual surgery, demonstrating that virtual reality simulators using artificial intelligence can be powerful tools in surgeon training. Fifty participants were recruited from four stages of neurosurgical training; neurosurgeons, fellows and senior residents, junior residents, and medical students. They performed 250 complex tumor resections using NeuroVR, a virtual reality surgical simulator developed by the National Research Council of Canada and distributed by CAE, which recorded all instrument movements in 20 millisecond intervals. Using this raw data, a machine learning algorithm developed performance measures such as instrument position and force applied, as well as outcomes such as amount of tumor removed and blood loss, which could predict the level of expertise of each participant with 90 per-cent accuracy.


Navy gets new flight simulator

FOX News

The U.S. Navy's latest flight simulator technology will be found among the exhibits at this year's Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) taking place in Orlando this week, according to an announcement by NVIDIA. Together with virtual reality (VR) creator Mass Virtual, NVIDIA said the technology runs its Quadro graphics processing unit (GPU) and uses Mass Virtual's Virtual Attain platform. The end result is a VR simulation that puts pilots in the cockpit of a F-18 fighter jet. Pilots are put through paces and have to determine whether or not an aggressor aircraft is nearby using sounds coming from the cockpit's radar. NVIDIA wrote that virtual reality training provides soldiers with various realistic combat situations.


Move over Oculus: Samsung may be working on secret 'Odyssey' virtual reality headset

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Samsung may be about to release a brand new virtual reality headset that won't need to be connected to a smartphone, PC or games console. The VR headset would be a standalone device, where you could download games and films directly onto the headset. If the rumours are true, Samsung could beat its VR rivals like HTC and Oculus who sell VR devices that need extra hardware to experience virtual reality. Consumer electronics giant Samsung may be about to release a brand new virtual reality headset that won't need to be connected to a smartphone, PC or games console. Oculus Rift: Bought by Facebook in 2014 for 2 billion, Oculess sells the Rift headset for around 1,000 ( 1,320).