Google tests Material Design makeover for Google search on the desktop

PCWorld

Google started testing a Material Design makeover on YouTube earlier this year, and now it's doing the same for the company's search engine on the desktop. A small set of Google users noticed their Google.com Google introduced Material Design in June 2014, saying in a blog post that the new aesthetic would be "one consistent design that spans devices across mobile, desktop, and beyond." YouTube's Material Design makeover is currently in testing. The change will be noticeable to longtime Google users, but at the same time the new design is more about subtle tweaks than drastic changes.


Google search on mobile is getting tabs for better results for movies and TV

Mashable

Google just made search results a lot more useful. The company is giving its mobile search results a new look, with a new set of tabs that show more information about television shows, movies, stocks, and books. SEE ALSO: Google's new Google Maps feature will make parking less of a nightmare Now when you search for a movie or TV show, Google will surface individual tabs that let you browse topics related to the search. This includes trailers, news stories, cast details, showtimes, and critic reviews. Google previously surfaced some of this information, like showtimes, directly in search results, but this is the first time it's all been organized by the type of info, which each type easily accessible with just a tap.


7 things you didn’t know Google Search could do until now

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Google Search is much more powerful than most people know. Google is way more powerful than most people realize. Regular searches are helpful, but they don't even scratch the surface of Google's abilities. Sometimes, your basic search inquiries may not be enough or you need a tip to get the best results. Fair warning: You can't mention Google without also mentioning tracking.


Google auto-detects your whereabouts to get local search results

Engadget

The country codes in Google's top-level domain names don't mean anything anymore. The tech titan has moved away from relying on country-specific domains to serve up localized results on mobile web, the Google app for iOS, as well as Search and Maps for desktop. Now, your location dictates the kind of results you'll get -- you could go to google.com.au, for instance, but if you're in New Zealand, you'll still get search results tailored for your current whereabouts. You'll know the location Google recognizes by looking at the lower left-hand corner of the page, as you can see above. Google will automatically detect if you go to another country and serve you results for your new location.


How Google's Results Page has Changed Over the Years

@machinelearnbot

Google changes its search algorithms around 500 to 600 times within a year. Most of this changes are minor, but sometimes Google makes a "major" algorithmic update such as the famous (Google Penguin and Google Panda) affecting the results in significant ways. For marketers, these changes are important because they explain more about the way websites are ranked and how to improve search engine optimization. More and more people rely on searches to find information as well as make purchasing decisions. From the way SERPs are structured, users opt to rely on the top ten results.