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Remote-learning technology just isn't good enough and won't be soon

New Scientist

PROPONENTS of education technology have made remarkable promises over the past two decades: that by 2019, half of all secondary school courses would be online; videos and practice problems can let students learn mathematics at their own pace; in 50 years only 10 mega-institutions of higher education would be left; or that typical students left alone with internet-connected computers can learn anything without the help of schools or teachers. Then in 2020, people around the world were forced to turn to online learning as the coronavirus pandemic shut down schools serving more than 1 billion students. It was education technology's big moment, but for many students and families, remote learning has been a disappointment. When the world needs it most, why has education technology seemed so lacklustre? Educational software has a long history, but throughout there have been two major challenges.


How you can become a VR developer for less than $35

Mashable

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission. As our regular reality has gotten weirder and weirder, virtual reality has become more and more interesting. Whether you're using one of the dedicated headsets like Oculus or a less invasive alternative like Google Cardboard, VR is having a moment. And with good reason: it's never been cheaper or easier to join the VR bandwagon and there are finally some interesting use cases. This collection of five courses hopes to teach you how to become a well-paid VR developer.


Human brain cells on microchips aim to 'push boundaries of AI'

#artificialintelligence

A pioneering new project has been unveiled that will use human brain stem cells on microchips in an effort to "push the boundaries of artificial intelligence". An international team led by scientists at Aston University hope that combining the power and adaptability of the human brain with traditional electronics will bring about a revolution in computing and produce supercharged AI. "Our aim is to harness the unrivalled computing power of the human brain to dramatically increase the ability of computers to help us solve complex problems," said David Saad, professor of mathematics at Aston University. "We believe this project has the potential to break through current limitations of processing power and energy consumption to bring about a paradigm shift in machine learning technology." The Neu-ChiP project has been awarded €3.5 million (£3.06m) in funding from the European Commission in order to explore the potential of the human brain within AI technology. It is the latest venture in an emerging field known as neuromorphic computing which uses models inspired by the workings of the human brain.


Mind Blowing Tech in Learning: AI, VR, and AR featuring Prof. Donald Clark @DonaldClark

#artificialintelligence

Hoy traemos a este espacio esta conferencia titulada "Mind Blowing Tech in Learning: AI, VR, and AR featuring" del Prof. Donald Clark, del Center for Online Innovation in Learning y que nos presentan así: Artificial intelligence (AI) is now the most potent force in IT and will shape learning technology, allowing us to escape from the 30 year paradigm of flat, linear e-learning. During this COIL Fischer Speaker Series presentation, Professor Donald Clark debunks some myths about AI and provide real examples of AI used now in content creation, feedback, assessment and spaced practice. In addition he will talk about virtual reality (VR) & augmented reality (AR) as reviving'learning by doing' and their power to democratize experience. Donald Clark is an EdTech entrepreneur and was CEO and one of the original founders of Epic Group plc, which established itself as the leading company in the UK online learning market, floated on the Stock Market in 1996 and sold in 2005, now CEO of Wildfire Ltd. he also invests in, and advises, EdTech companies. Describing himself as'free from the tyranny of employment', he is a board member of Cogbooks, LearningPool, WildFire and Deputy Chair of Brighton Dome & Arts Festival as well as a Visiting Professor at The University of Derby and Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA).


How to master marketing and user engagement for less than $30

Mashable

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission. There's a reason that companies are willing to pay big to marketing pros -- even the best business won't go far if no one knows how to reach potential customers. And it's not just big companies that need marketing. Whether you run a one-person business or just want to get more eyeballs on your blog, mastering techniques like building a subscriber list, running retargeting campaigns, and using data to your advantage are essential. If that sounds overwhelming, don't worry -- getting those skills doesn't mean going back to school and paying a ton of money for training.