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Team builds first living robots that can reproduce

Robohub

AI-designed (C-shaped) organisms push loose stem cells (white) into piles as they move through their environment. To persist, life must reproduce. Over billions of years, organisms have evolved many ways of replicating, from budding plants to sexual animals to invading viruses. Now scientists at the University of Vermont, Tufts University, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have discovered an entirely new form of biological reproduction--and applied their discovery to create the first-ever, self-replicating living robots. The same team that built the first living robots ("Xenobots," assembled from frog cells--reported in 2020) has discovered that these computer-designed and hand-assembled organisms can swim out into their tiny dish, find single cells, gather hundreds of them together, and assemble "baby" Xenobots inside their Pac-Man-shaped "mouth"--that, a few days later, become new Xenobots that look and move just like themselves.


Team builds first living robots--that can reproduce

#artificialintelligence

Over billions of years, organisms have evolved many ways of replicating, from budding plants to sexual animals to invading viruses. Now scientists at the University of Vermont, Tufts University, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have discovered an entirely new form of biological reproduction--and applied their discovery to create the first-ever, self-replicating living robots. The same team that built the first living robots ("Xenobots," assembled from frog cells--reported in 2020) has discovered that these computer-designed and hand-assembled organisms can swim out into their tiny dish, find single cells, gather hundreds of them together, and assemble "baby" Xenobots inside their Pac-Man-shaped "mouth"--that, a few days later, become new Xenobots that look and move just like themselves. And then these new Xenobots can go out, find cells, and build copies of themselves. "With the right design--they will spontaneously self-replicate," says Joshua Bongard, Ph.D., a computer scientist and robotics expert at the University of Vermont who co-led the new research.


Scientists build first living robots that can reproduce

Daily Mail - Science & tech

In a potential breakthrough for regenerative medicine, scientists have created the first-ever living robots that can reproduce. The millimetre-sized living machines, called Xenobots 3.0, are neither traditional robots nor a species of animal, but living, programmable organisms. Made from frog cells, the computer-designed organisms, created by a US team, gather single cells inside a Pac-Man-shaped'mouth' and release'babies' that look and move like their parents. Self-replicating living bio-robots could enable more direct, personalised drug treatment for traumatic injury, birth defects, cancer, ageing and more. Xenobots 3.0 can gather hundreds of single cells, compress them and assemble them into'babies' released from their Pac-Man-shaped mouths Xenobots are neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal, but a living, programmable organism.


Living machines: the first bio robots with Artificial Intelligence were born - OI Canadian

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As if it were a graphic novel by Science fiction, the first birth of robots called xenobots in the United States, which were made with frog cells. The xenobots are bio robots millimeter that could be replicated from themselves. Researchers from the universities of Vermont, Tufts and Harvard noted that in 2020 the first of their kind were assembled from frog cells. These organisms were designed on a computer and assembled by hand; they can swim in a petri dish, find individual cells, and collect hundreds of them, the University of Vermont reported late last November. These robots that can have "children" they are shaped like Pac-man and it keeps these cells inside its "mouth", they are also capable of assembling "babies" that look and move in the same way as they do.


World's first living robots can now reproduce, scientists say

#artificialintelligence

Formed from the stem cells of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) from which it takes its name, xenobots are less than a millimeter (0.04 inches) wide. The tiny blobs were first unveiled in 2020 after experiments showed that they could move, work together in groups and self-heal. Now the scientists that developed them at the University of Vermont, Tufts University and Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering said they have discovered an entirely new form of biological reproduction different from any animal or plant known to science. "I was astounded by it," said Michael Levin, a professor of biology and director of the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University who was co-lead author of the new research. "Frogs have a way of reproducing that they normally use but when you ... liberate (the cells) from the rest of the embryo and you give them a chance to figure out how to be in a new environment, not only do they figure out a new way to move, but they also figure out apparently a new way to reproduce."