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Trump tells black churchgoers in Detroit 'I'm here to learn'

PBS NewsHour

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks with Shalga Hightower, mother of Iofemi Hightower who was killed in 2007, at a meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Sept. 2, 2016. DETROIT -- Donald Trump said Saturday he wanted to help rebuild Detroit and told members of a black church that "there are many wrongs that should be made right" as the GOP presidential nominee tried to woo African-Americans two months before the election. Seated in the front row was Omarosa Manigault, a former contestant on Trump's reality television series who has been helping guide his outreach to the black community. Also in the audience was Detroit native Ben Carson, the retired neurosurgeon who ran against Trump in the primaries and is now advising the campaign. While protesters were a vocal presence outside, Trump made a pitch inside for support from an electorate strongly aligned with Democrat Hillary Clinton.


Some Detroit blacks not rolling out welcome mat for Trump

Associated Press

In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016, photo, Toni McIlwain stands outside the building that housed her Ravendale Community nonprofit that offered education and drug prevention programs in Detroit. Trump is planning to attend a service Saturday at an African American church in Detroit. In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016, photo, Toni McIlwain stands outside the building that housed her Ravendale Community nonprofit that offered education and drug prevention programs in Detroit. Horace Sheffield, one of several prominent pastors, labor leaders and elected officials planning a silent march Saturday morning to Bishop Jackson's church.


The daunting struggle to diversify elite public high schools

PBS NewsHour

GWEN IFILL: As the school year nears its end, a number of highly selective public high schools around the country are struggling to deal with a longer-term problem, how to enroll more students of color. Special correspondent Spencer Michels looks at one such school, in this report produced in association with Education Week. Motivated, hard-driving and talented students have propelled this four-year institution to the top tier of national public school rankings. Its graduates include scientists, politicians, entertainers and a Supreme Court justice. Chrislyn Earle, here in a psychology class, is a senior.


The Coronavirus Has Intensified Systemic Economic Racism Against Black Americans

The New Yorker

The last day that Nicole Smith worked at her twelve-dollar-an-hour job as an after-school teacher in Smyrna, Georgia, was March 13th. A month later, her husband, Reggie, was furloughed from his job installing hardware and software for an I.T. company. For three months Reggie had no paycheck, but this week his firm asked him to return to work. Nicole doesn't know if she'll ever return to her job. With little savings, this African-American couple has struggled to stay current on their rent and avoid having their ten-year-old Dodge Charger repossessed.


African American students thrive with high graduation rates at UC Riverside

Los Angeles Times

The graduates wore traditional caps and gowns, but they didn't sit quietly awaiting their diplomas or form a solemn processional to the strains of "Pomp and Circumstance." They cheered Nigerian and Abyssinian dance troupes. They got to their feet for a rousing spoken word performance. They whooped as speaker after speaker reminded them of what they'd just accomplished. "The statistics were against you, but you prevailed and I am so, so proud of you," Sharee Hughes of the school's African Student Programs told them.