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University of Tokyo team's robots mimic human exercise, even working up a sweat

The Japan Times

A team of Japanese researchers has built two humanoid robots that can do pushups, situps and stretches just like their human creators. One can even sweat, releasing heat generated by the physical activity.


Skin deep? Robots to wear real human tissue The Memo

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Growing muscles and tendons on a humanoid like the University of Tokyo's Kenshiro robot however, would allow transplants to work because it has "structures, dimensions, and mechanics similar to those of the human body," say Mouthuy and Carr. Healthy tissue needed for a hand, could be grown on an actual robotic hand, a leg tendon on a leg. What's more this would be a step toward "biohybrid humanoids" – bots of the future whose human muscles, tendons, and skin can self-repair. Dressing up robots in human tissue isn't the only way scientists are using tech to innovate transplants: medical researchers in Spain are already using patient cells to 3D-print human skin. The process could transform millions of lives, say scientists from Charles III University of Madrid – in particular the 11m people who become burn victims each year.


Protecting Humanity In The Face Of Artificial Intelligence

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The evolution of artificial intelligence (AI) -- from artificial narrow intelligence (ANI), through artificial general intelligence (AGI), to artificial super intelligence (ASI) -- is on its way to changing everything. It's expected that soon, artificial intelligence will combine the intricacy and pattern recognition strength of human intelligence with the speed, memory and knowledge sharing of machine intelligence. As the rise of AI continues, AI is challenging and changing not only the way humans live, learn and work, but also how entities across nations: its government, industries, organizations and academia (NGIOA) construct their commercial and economic industries and markets. With this technology driven growth of artificial intelligence, the need to do most manual, mathematical and mundane work is already in decline and will likely be greatly diminished in the coming years. Moreover, with all these new digital assistants and decision-making algorithms assisting and directing humans, more complex day-to-day work for humans is being greatly lessened.


AI may beat humans at everything in 45 years, experts predict

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These experts offer up a possible timescale, and some practical solutions. Every decade since artificial intelligence was first formed as its own discipline in 1956, there's been a prediction that artificial general intelligence (AGI) is just a few years away -- and so far we can safely say that most of them have been shy of the mark. A new survey, conducted by the University of Oxford and Yale University, draws on the expertise of 352 leading AI researchers. It suggests that there's a 50-percent chance that machines will be bettering us at every task by the year 2062. However, plenty more milestones will be hit before then.


AI may beat humans at everything in 45 years, experts predict

#artificialintelligence

Every decade since artificial intelligence was first formed as its own discipline in 1956, there's been a prediction that artificial general intelligence (AGI) is just a few years away -- and so far we can safely say that most of them have been shy of the mark. A new survey, conducted by the University of Oxford and Yale University, draws on the expertise of 352 leading AI researchers. It suggests that there's a 50-percent chance that machines will be bettering us at every task by the year 2062. However, plenty more milestones will be hit before then. These include machines that are better than us at translating foreign languages by 2024, better at writing high school essays than us by 2026, better at driving trucks by 2027, better at working retail jobs by 2031, capable of penning a best-selling book by 2049, and better at carrying out surgery by 2053.