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US Air Force funds Explainable-AI for UAV tech

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Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC) of Potomac, MD announced on August 27 that it is funded by the US Air Force, to use ZAC's detailed 3D image recognition technology, based on Explainable-AI, for drones (unmanned aerial vehicle or UAV) for aerial image/object recognition. ZAC is the first to demonstrate Explainable-AI, where various attributes and details of 3D (three dimensional) objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," said Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "For complex tasks, such as drone vision, you need ZAC's superior technology to handle detailed 3D image recognition." "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as Deep Convolutional Neural Networks, even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," continued Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


U.S. Air Force invests in Explainable-AI for unmanned aircraft

#artificialintelligence

Software star-up, Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC), has received funding from the U.S. Air Force to incorporate the company's 3D image recognition technology into unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and drones for aerial image and object recognition. ZAC's in-house image recognition software is based on Explainable-AI (XAI), where computer-generated image results can be understood by human experts. ZAC – based in Potomac, Maryland – is the first to demonstrate XAI, where various attributes and details of 3D objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," says Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," adds Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


Attacking Artificial Intelligence: AI's Security Vulnerability and What Policymakers Can Do About It

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Artificial intelligence systems can be attacked. The methods underpinning the state-of-the-art artificial intelligence systems are systematically vulnerable to a new type of cybersecurity attack called an "artificial intelligence attack." Using this attack, adversaries can manipulate these systems in order to alter their behavior to serve a malicious end goal. As artificial intelligence systems are further integrated into critical components of society, these artificial intelligence attacks represent an emerging and systematic vulnerability with the potential to have significant effects on the security of the country. These "AI attacks" are fundamentally different from traditional cyberattacks. Unlike traditional cyberattacks that are caused by "bugs" or human mistakes in code, AI attacks are enabled by inherent limitations in the underlying AI algorithms that currently cannot be fixed. Further, AI attacks fundamentally expand the set of entities that can be used to execute ...


Interpretable Image Recognition with Hierarchical Prototypes

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Vision models are interpretable when they classify objects on the basis of features that a person can directly understand. Recently, methods relying on visual feature prototypes have been developed for this purpose. However, in contrast to how humans categorize objects, these approaches have not yet made use of any taxonomical organization of class labels. With such an approach, for instance, we may see why a chimpanzee is classified as a chimpanzee, but not why it was considered to be a primate or even an animal. In this work we introduce a model that uses hierarchically organized prototypes to classify objects at every level in a predefined taxonomy. Hence, we may find distinct explanations for the prediction an image receives at each level of the taxonomy. The hierarchical prototypes enable the model to perform another important task: interpretably classifying images from previously unseen classes at the level of the taxonomy to which they correctly relate, e.g. classifying a hand gun as a weapon, when the only weapons in the training data are rifles. With a subset of ImageNet, we test our model against its counterpart black-box model on two tasks: 1) classification of data from familiar classes, and 2) classification of data from previously unseen classes at the appropriate level in the taxonomy. We find that our model performs approximately as well as its counterpart black-box model while allowing for each classification to be interpreted.


What Is Computer Vision?

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An introduction to the field of computer vision and image recognition, and how Deep Learning is fueling the fire of this hot topic. Computer Vision is an interdisciplinary field that focuses on how machines or computers can emulate the way in which humans' brains and eyes work together to visually process the world around them. Research on Computer Vision can be traced back to beginning in the 1960s. The 1970's saw the foundations of computer vision algorithms used today being made; like the shift from basic digital image processing to focusing on the understanding of the 3D structure of scenes, edge extraction and line-labelling. Over the years, computer vision has developed many applications; 3D imaging, facial recognition, autonomous driving, drone technology and medical diagnostics to name a few.