Facebook Pitches Brand Safety Ahead of Video Ad Push

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

As Facebook FB -0.05% ramps up its new "in-stream" video advertising, the social media company is attempting to avoid the brand safety headaches that have plagued rivals such as YouTube in recent months. Facebook on Wednesday introduced new "monetization eligibility standards" it said are designed to provide more clear guidance on the types of content that will be allowed to have advertising run alongside it on the platform. It will also specify the types of publishers and video creators who can earn money from ads on Facebook. The company said it would not place ads alongside content that focuses on tragedy, conflict or debated social issues, or that depicts acts or threats of violence, for example. It will remove ads from content that fails to comply with its guidelines.


Pivoting to video is the biggest trend in media -- but it may not prove as lucrative as publishers hope

Los Angeles Times

To ensure maximum share-ability, such a video had to be short -- no more than 40 seconds long -- and enjoyable either with or without sound as users scrolled their feeds. The team found its solution in how-to-cooking clips, and soon the mouthwatering videos made by its Tasty sub-brand began taking Facebook by storm. BuzzFeed's success with Tasty, along with the widespread popularity of rival food channels such as Tastemade and Delish, did not go unnoticed. Much of the media world has since invested in producing short videos to be shared across social media and watched (muted or with sound) on mobile devices. With brands expected to spend $22 billion on video ads in the U.S. by 2022 -- a 68% jump from 2017, according to eMarketer -- social media platforms likely will be filled with even more quick clips in the years to come.


Pivoting to video is the biggest trend in media -- but it may not prove as lucrative as publishers hope

Los Angeles Times

To ensure maximum share-ability, such a video had to be short -- no more than 40 seconds long -- and enjoyable either with or without sound as users scrolled their feeds. The team found its solution in how-to-cooking clips, and soon the mouthwatering videos made by its Tasty sub-brand began taking Facebook by storm. BuzzFeed's success with Tasty, along with the widespread popularity of rival food channels such as Tastemade and Delish, did not go unnoticed. Much of the media world has since invested in producing short videos to be shared across social media and watched (muted or with sound) on mobile devices. With brands expected to spend $22 billion on video ads in the U.S. by 2022 -- a 68% jump from 2017, according to eMarketer -- social media platforms likely will be filled with even more quick clips in the years to come.


Are Facebook's Bad Metrics to Blame for 'Pivot to Video'?

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The allegations have rankled many in the media industry who watched as publishing companies shifted resources away from traditional text and toward shareable videos based, in part, on hopes they would perform well on Facebook and eventually pay off financially. The so-called pivot to video proved ruinous for some publishers that emphasized underwhelming video at the expense of their own website audiences. "If they would've known that their video was being watched on a significantly shorter duration than it actually was, would they have been less likely to aggressively shift resources into Facebook video?" asked Jason Kint, the chief executive of Digital Content Next, a trade organization that advocates for publishers. Fox Sports, Mic Networks Inc. and Mashable were among the group of digital publishers that laid off writers to make room for video producers. Each was seeking to accelerate its digital advertising growth and tap into higher engagement for video content on social media.


Digital Publishers Promise New Ways To Make Ads Go Viral In The Post-Website Era

International Business Times

The modern digital media company doesn't just have to make sponsored content for its advertising partners. In 2016, it also has to help those partners figure out where it's going to live. Just a few years after every digital media company promised to start making sponsored content -- shorthand for advertisements dressed up to look like a website's original content -- a growing number of those same media companies are now vowing to help blast those advertisements across the social web as more and more readers discover and consume content away from the websites that make it. "We're incredibly excited to now offer our brand partners the opportunity to extend the reach of their multiplatform campaigns," Mashable founder and CEO Pete Cashmore said Friday, ahead of his company's annual presentation to advertisers during the IAB NewFronts in New York. Companies like Mashable are doing this because the winds of change are blowing.