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Team builds first living robots--that can reproduce

#artificialintelligence

Over billions of years, organisms have evolved many ways of replicating, from budding plants to sexual animals to invading viruses. Now scientists at the University of Vermont, Tufts University, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have discovered an entirely new form of biological reproduction--and applied their discovery to create the first-ever, self-replicating living robots. The same team that built the first living robots ("Xenobots," assembled from frog cells--reported in 2020) has discovered that these computer-designed and hand-assembled organisms can swim out into their tiny dish, find single cells, gather hundreds of them together, and assemble "baby" Xenobots inside their Pac-Man-shaped "mouth"--that, a few days later, become new Xenobots that look and move just like themselves. And then these new Xenobots can go out, find cells, and build copies of themselves. "With the right design--they will spontaneously self-replicate," says Joshua Bongard, Ph.D., a computer scientist and robotics expert at the University of Vermont who co-led the new research.


Team builds first living robots that can reproduce: AI-designed Xenobots reveal entirely new form of biological self-replication--promising for regenerative medicine

#artificialintelligence

Now scientists at the University of Vermont, Tufts University, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have discovered an entirely new form of biological reproduction -- and applied their discovery to create the first-ever, self-replicating living robots. The same team that built the first living robots ("Xenobots," assembled from frog cells -- reported in 2020) has discovered that these computer-designed and hand-assembled organisms can swim out into their tiny dish, find single cells, gather hundreds of them together, and assemble "baby" Xenobots inside their Pac-Man-shaped "mouth" -- that, a few days later, become new Xenobots that look and move just like themselves. And then these new Xenobots can go out, find cells, and build copies of themselves. "With the right design -- they will spontaneously self-replicate," says Joshua Bongard, Ph.D., a computer scientist and robotics expert at the University of Vermont who co-led the new research. The results of the new research were published November 29, 2021, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Scientists build first living robots that can reproduce

Daily Mail - Science & tech

In a potential breakthrough for regenerative medicine, scientists have created the first-ever living robots that can reproduce. The millimetre-sized living machines, called Xenobots 3.0, are neither traditional robots nor a species of animal, but living, programmable organisms. Made from frog cells, the computer-designed organisms, created by a US team, gather single cells inside a Pac-Man-shaped'mouth' and release'babies' that look and move like their parents. Self-replicating living bio-robots could enable more direct, personalised drug treatment for traumatic injury, birth defects, cancer, ageing and more. Xenobots 3.0 can gather hundreds of single cells, compress them and assemble them into'babies' released from their Pac-Man-shaped mouths Xenobots are neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal, but a living, programmable organism.


Living robots made in a lab have found a new way to self-replicate, researchers say

NPR Technology

A dozen organisms designed by artificial intelligence known as xenobots (C-shaped; beige) beside loose frog stem cells (white). A dozen organisms designed by artificial intelligence known as xenobots (C-shaped; beige) beside loose frog stem cells (white). Scientists say they've witnessed a never-before-seen type of replication in organic robots created in the lab using frog cells. Among other things, the findings could have implications for regenerative medicine. The discovery involves a xenobot – a simple, "programmable" organism that is created by assembling stem cells in a Petri dish -- and is described by a team of researchers from Tufts University, Harvard University and the University of Vermont in a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Living machines: the first bio robots with Artificial Intelligence were born - OI Canadian

#artificialintelligence

As if it were a graphic novel by Science fiction, the first birth of robots called xenobots in the United States, which were made with frog cells. The xenobots are bio robots millimeter that could be replicated from themselves. Researchers from the universities of Vermont, Tufts and Harvard noted that in 2020 the first of their kind were assembled from frog cells. These organisms were designed on a computer and assembled by hand; they can swim in a petri dish, find individual cells, and collect hundreds of them, the University of Vermont reported late last November. These robots that can have "children" they are shaped like Pac-man and it keeps these cells inside its "mouth", they are also capable of assembling "babies" that look and move in the same way as they do.