Cities at Night project calls for users to identify locations from ISS shots at night

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Aboard the International Space Station, astronauts have photographed the Earth from a unique perspective, sending back countless photos that show the world's cities illuminated at night. Now, a project called Cities at Night is tapping into citizen science to identify the thousands of pictures astronauts have taken over the years. While the project has revealed some remarkable views of Earth's cities, the researchers also caution that these images show the growing problem of light pollution as cities grow continuously brighter. A project called Cities at Night is tapping into citizen science to identify the thousands of pictures astronauts have taken over the years. The researchers also caution that these images show the growing problem of light pollution as cities grow continuously brighter.


Why does Belgium shine so brightly?

BBC News

Belgium's penchant for extravagant motorway lighting is suddenly in the spotlight thanks to pictures posted by French astronaut Thomas Pesquet. The images of Europe taken from the International Space Station (ISS) have notched up tens of thousands of reactions on Facebook. Belgium can be seen glowing more brightly than its neighbours. The country's dense road network enjoys near-total streetlight coverage, with lights kept on throughout the night. It uses about 2.2 million bulbs to illuminate Belgium's roads - with 186 bulbs per square mile, the New York Times reports.


Now THAT'S a room with a view: Stunning pictures taken by astronauts on the space station show Earth's beauty and fragility

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It has travelled more than 2.6 billion miles and circled the Earth more than 100,000 times since it launched into space 17 years ago. During their time on board the International Space Station, the crews living there have enjoyed some of the best views of our planet imaginable. So it is hardly surprising that they have now taken more than three million images on board as they orbit 249 miles above the Earth. The current expedition of astronauts on board the International Space Station has seen some extraordinary images beamed back from orbit. Yet despite this, the images beamed back by the current group of astronauts on the space station are widely considered to be among the best.


ISS astronaut capture 'mind blowing' footage of lighting and auroras

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Stunning new footage taken form the international Space Station has revealed the surface of the Earth lit up by lighting and auroras. Taken by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst, the footage show numerous flashes during the dark night. The German astronaut described the sight as'Mind blowing. Like a symphony orchestra turned into light.' The lightning captured in this time-lapse from aboard the International Space Station is reminiscent of camera flashes in the night,' tweeted the European Space Agency.


How to see the International Space Station: Interactive Nasa tool reveals the best time to look out for the ISS in your location

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you look up at the sky night over the next few nights, you could be in with a chance of seeing the International Space Station (ISS). The space station will be visible to the naked eye with clear skies, letting anyone sneak a peek at ISS which orbits the Earth at an altitude of roughly 255 miles (410km). Nasa's'Spot the Station' website tells people when the ISS will be able to be seen from their own city, how long it should be visible and at what point in the sky. Nasa's'Spot the Station' website (module above) tells people when the ISS will be able to be seen from their own city, how long it should be visible and at what point in the sky Tonight the ISS can be spotted from the UK at 8.55PM and 10.31PM, then on Wednesday at 9:38 PM for 4 minutes and at 11:15 PM for less than a minute. The space station is only visible for a few minutes at a time as it speeds past, travelling at 17,100 miles (27,600km) per hour.