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In March, I am launching our brand new AI Accelerator for BCS Women in association with BCS AI Special Interest Group (SIG). Based on broadcasts, panel sessions and social media discussions, about Artificial Intelligence (AI), its prime purpose is to make AI more relevant to women and encourage more females into computing. It is free - and open to men as well. However, at BCSWomen, we have recently published our latest Scorecard showing just 17% of people working in IT are women. Depressing, to put it mildly and especially considering all the initiatives that are going on to improve gender equality in this sector?


Free AI webinars for women and men launched by Sarah Burnett

#artificialintelligence

In March 2017, Sarah Burnett, chair of BCSWomen, launched the brand new AI Accelerator for BCSWomen in association with BCS AI Special Interest Group (SIG). Based on broadcasts, panel sessions and social media discussions, about Artificial Intelligence (AI), its prime purpose is to make AI more relevant to women and encourage more females into computing. It is free – and open to men as well. We hope women will sign up in their droves to AI Accelerator and see just what opportunities there are. Our first event was a live webcast held on March 30.


Meet 7 of London’s standout female tech stars

Mashable

The tech space has stereotypically been headed up by men. From Steve Jobs to Elon Musk, you'll find a male stamp permeating the pages of the tech revolution tale. But women have always been on the scene, perhaps now more than ever. One place where the XX chromosome is ascending rapidly through the ranks is in the UK. As a major player in the technology scene, London is home to some of the brightest young tech talent on the planet.


Voting open: vote now for the most influential woman in UK technology 2018

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Rappaport is CEO of digital coaching service Emoquo, which aims to give people advice and coaching surrounding a number of everyday work issues such as conflict, diversity and performance. As well as being an advocate for positive mental health in the workplace, Rappaport has held a number of roles in the technology industry such as digital transformation and customer experience consultant, and senior director of Microsoft Office, UK, for Microsoft. She also acts as an advisor for The Telegraph. Bentinck is the co-founder of Entrepreneur First, a firm focused on supporting technology startups from around Europe. As part of the Entrepreneur First initiative, Bentinck also co-founded Code First: Girls, an organisation which provides part-time coding courses across university campuses. Bentinck was on the advisory board of Founders4Schools for two years, and is on the Computer Science Department Industrial Liaison Board for Imperial College London. Amali de Alwis is the CEO for coding education initiative Code First: Girls which teaches students across university campuses how to code. De Alwis also acts as a CommonwealthFirst Mentor for the Commonwealth Enterprise and Investment Council, providing mentorship and encouragement to small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs).


How the most vulnerable workers to job automation can adapt

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In recent decades, women have made huge gains in employment. But the rise in job automation is threatening to undo that. Jobs held by women are more likely to be displaced by automation, according to The World Economic Forum's 2020 report on the global gender gap, while men are more likely to be employed in less vulnerable roles. To avoid job irrelevance, female workers must approach education and their careers in new ways, finding opportunities in areas that predominantly employ men. "The jobs that are emerging are not very gender-equal," said Vesselina Ratcheva, the data lead at the World Economic Forum.