When It Comes to Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare, Patients Fear the Replacement of Doctors, Yet Are Open to AI Nurse Support

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Fears of AI in Healthcare: The survey indicates that the top two fears patients and caregivers have when it comes to artificial intelligence are lack of human oversight and the potential for machine errors leading to mismanagement of their health. No Substitute for Your Doctor: When it comes to the possibilities of doctors being replaced by algorithms or robots, fears are clearly evident with fewer than 20 percent of patients surveyed perceiving any benefit to their future healthcare in receiving diagnosis or treatment recommendations from a virtual assistant. Strong Comfort in Using AI to Scale and Support Nurses: Switch the focus to the critical role played by nurses in supporting patients, and a different picture emerges. The number one benefit is seen as 24x7 on-demand access to answers and support, followed by monitoring for their general health and wellness, or for questions around a specific medication they've been prescribed. A'realistic voice' with a professional, warm and empathetic tone is seen as appealing by 72 percent - more important than a human name, face or gender. Appropriate Providers of AI: When asked to rank potential providers of AI-powered virtual nurse assistants in terms of trust, tech companies are toward the bottom of the list, alongside insurers. Healthcare providers such as doctors, pharmacists or hospitals rank highest.


Robotics and Big Data are Transforming Nursing: 4 Key Insights -

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If you're not a member of the healthcare community, then you might not be aware of a quiet crisis creeping up on hospitals all over the country: not enough nurses and too many patients. This trend is partially fueled by the Baby Boomers who are reaching old age. Baby Boomer nurses are beginning to retire, leaving a shortfall of skilled and experienced healthcare providers. The Boomer generation as a whole requires more medical care as they enter their 60s and 70s. Complex problems like the nursing shortage require creative solutions.


MIT-Developed Robot Helps Nurses Make Decisions

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BOSTON (CBS) – Robots in the operating room are nothing new--but now, a robot named Ginger has been specifically designed to help nurses. Kristen Jerrier works on the Labor and Delivery floor at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She's the resource nurse, which pretty much means she's in charge. "I usually decide which nurse will take that patient, what room they'll go to and I'm usually talking to the physician about what that patient might need," she says. And when it comes to the business of delivering babies, things can get hectic real fast.


Genene Jones, Ex-Texas Nurse Accused Of Killing Dozens Of Babies, Charged Again In Infant's Death

International Business Times

A San Antonio grand jury convicted a former Texas nurse, Genene Jones on Wednesday on a new murder charge for the second time in recent weeks, as the prosecutors claimed she may be responsible for the murder of 60 infants. Jones was first indicted in 1984 for killing a child, and was labeled as "angel of death." She was sentenced to 99 years in prison for murdering the 15-month-old girl in Kerrville, Texas by injecting her with powerful drugs. The 66-year-old former nurse was convicted, Wednesday in a murder case that dates back to more than three decades. The 2-year-old child named Rosemary Vega died in 1981.


National Nurses Week 2017: 15 Best And Worst States For Nursing Jobs

International Business Times

To coincide with National Nurses Week, which runs May 6-12, personal finance website WalletHub released new data Wednesday revealing the most and least favorable states for nurses. With the occupation projected to grow 16 percent by 2024, the research specifically appealed to individuals looking to enter the field. The data considered such factors as average starting salary, job availability and health care facilities per capita. "In order to help newly minted nurses find the best markets for their profession, WalletHub's analysts compared the relative attractiveness of the 50 states and the District of Columbia across 18 key metrics," said the report. "Each metric was graded on a 100-point scale, with a score of 100 representing the most favorable conditions for nurses."