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Counterdrone Technologies Face Slow Ramp-Up at Airports Globally

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Congress, however, has instructed the Federal Aviation Administration to develop a strategy to permit wide use of counterdrone technologies across airports. But like most airports, such entities generally refrain from publicly spelling out their plans. But the Southern California company soon switched gears to focus on sales to the Defense Department while it waited for commercial prospects to develop. "Unfortunately, innovation outpaced regulation," Mr. Williams said, and "it has put the market in a stalemate." To identify and deter drone intruders, companies are relying on a combination of mobile radars, video systems and acoustic devices, according to Pablo Estrada, vice president of marketing for San Francisco-based Dedrone Inc.


Weapon makers declare war on drones

FOX News

Arms manufacturers are rushing to develop missile systems to take down drones. Arms makers are targeting the growing menace of drones at airports and on battlefields with a rush to develop new missile systems, radar jammers and laser cannons. U.S. forces, along with Middle East allies and Russian troops, have been forced to confront hostile drone operations. Commercial flights at some of the world's busiest hubs--in New York, London and Dubai--have been grounded in recent months amid concerns that nearby drones could endanger airliners. The rising number of incidents has put the threat in the public eye and propelled interest in anti-drone technology.


Airport drone disruption: All major UK airports to have 'military-grade' protection

BBC News

All major UK airports now have or will soon have military grade anti-drone equipment, the government says. It comes after the military were called in to help when drone sightings caused delays for around an hour at Heathrow on Tuesday. And drone sightings at Gatwick caused major disruption affecting 140,000 passengers before Christmas. Earlier, the defence secretary said it would "not be right" to ask the RAF to respond to similar incidents in future. Gavin Williamson said all commercial airports needed to invest in anti-drone technology.


Dubai Airport drone scare temporarily disrupts flights

Engadget

Dubai International Airport is the latest to halt flights over a drone scare following similar incidents at London's Gatwick and Heathrow. The world's third-busiest airport temporarily stopped operations for just under 30 minutes due to "unauthorized drone activity," according to a tweet from the Dubai Media Office. Incoming flights were permitted to land during the disruption, reports The New York Times, which occurred between 10.15AM and 10.45AM local time. Operations are now reportedly back to normal. "Dubai Airports has worked closely with the appropriate authorities to ensure that the safety of airport operations is maintained at all times and to minimize any inconvenience to our customers," the airport said.


Gatwick and Heathrow airports order military-grade anti-drone equipment

The Japan Times

BANGALORE, INDIA - London's Gatwick and Heathrow airports have ordered military-grade anti-drone defenses worth "several million pounds" after drones caused three days of disruption at Gatwick last month, the airports confirmed late on Thursday. "While I can't go into detail about exactly what we have, I can confirm this was an investment of several million pounds to ensure we are at an equivalent level to that provided by the Armed Forces," a Gatwick spokeswoman said in an emailed statement. Gatwick said the new equipment had been in place for over a week. The statement did not give further details. Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, also said it had ordered the equipment.