Professors Build AI to Help Autonomous Vehicles Locate Themselves On Maps

#artificialintelligence

Self-driving cars could account for 21 million new vehicles sold every year by 2035. Over the next decade alone such vehicles--and vehicles with assisted-driving technology --could deliver $1 trillion in societal and consumer benefits due to their improved safety. For autonomous vehicles to make good on that promise they will need onboard artificial intelligence (AI) technology able to link them to highly detailed maps that reflect every change in the status of lanes, hazards, obstacles, and speed-limits in real time. Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering are making this critical machine-to-machine handshake possible. Yi Fang, a research assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a faculty member at NYU Abu Dhabi, and Edward K. Wong, an associate professor in the NYU Tandon Department of Computer Science and Engineering, are developing a deep learning system that will allow self-driving cars to navigate, maneuver, and respond to changing road conditions by mating data from onboard sensors to information on HERE HD Live Map, a cloud-based service for automated driving.


Ford acquires SAIPS for self-driving machine learning and computer vision tech

#artificialintelligence

Ford outlined a few of the ways it's aiming to ship driverless cars by 2021, and part of the plan involves acquisitions. CEO Mark Fields revealed at a press event in Palo Alto today that the automaker acquired SAIPS, an Israeli company focusing on machine learning and computer vision. It's also partnering exclusively with Nirenberg Neuroscience, to bring more "humanlike intelligence" to machine learning components of driverless car systems. SAIPS' technology brings image and video processing algorithms, as well as deep learning tech focused on processing and classifying input signals, all key ingredients in the special sauce that makes up autonomous vehicle tech. This company's expertise should help with on-board interpretation of data captured by sensors on Ford's self-driving cars, and turning that data into usable info for the car's virtual driver system.


Ford acquires SAIPS for self-driving machine learning and computer vision tech

#artificialintelligence

Ford outlined a few of the ways it's aiming to ship driverless cars by 2021, and part of the plan involves acquisitions. CEO Mark Fields revealed at a press event in Palo Alto today that the automaker acquired SAIPS, an Israeli company focusing on machine learning and computer vision. It's also partnering exclusively with Nirenberg Neuroscience, to bring more "humanlike intelligence" to machine learning components of driverless car systems. SAIPS' technology brings image and video processing algorithms, as well as deep learning tech focused on processing and classifying input signals, all key ingredients in the special sauce that makes up autonomous vehicle tech. This company's expertise should help with on-board interpretation of data captured by sensors on Ford's self-driving cars, and turning that data into usable info for the car's virtual driver system.


Video Friday: Deep Learning for Cars, Space Invaders With Drones, and Disagreeable Robot

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next two months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. Here's a taste of what's to come: In contrast to the usual approach to operating self-driving cars, we did not program any explicit object detection, mapping, path planning or control components into this car. Instead, the car learns on its own to create all necessary internal representations necessary to steer, simply by observing human drivers.


Company Designs Driverless Car Deep Learning Kit

#artificialintelligence

Drive.ai is a Silicon Valley startup working on a kit to retrofit your ride If Drive.ai is a success, your first self-driving car might already be parked in the driveway. The Silicon Valley start-up, founded recently by a team of former Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Lab products, is working on a software kit that can be used to retrofit existing vehicles. "We started Drive.ai because we believe there's a real opportunity to make our roads, our commutes, and our families safer," the company announced in a statement on its blog, citing a statistic that more than one million people die each year worldwide in automobile accidents caused by human error. At its foundation, Drive.ai is looking to use deep learning -- which its founders consider the most effective form of artificial intelligence ever developed -- to key a breakthrough in a field that giant companies such as Google and General Motors have been trying to master for years. "Unlike other forms of AI, which involve programming many sets of rules, a deep learning algorithm learns more like a human brain.