Quiz asks you to spot the difference between Trump's speeches and AI software's

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A study has shed light on a new threat in the upcoming US presidential election – artificial intelligence. Experts have developed a text generating AI, dubbed'RoboTrump', to see if people can differentiate between the real US President's speech and a robot's. The team found that 60 percent of participants could not tell the difference and a majority of these individuals were Trump supporters. The study, developed by Lawsuit.org, Following the test, 43 percent of the participants said they were more concerned about the implications of AI-generated text on the 2020 election than prior to taking the quiz.


Stephen Colbert totally rips apart that creepy new Donald Trump robot

Mashable

If you were unfortunate enough to set eyes on Disney's new Donald Trump robot on Tuesday, the nightmarish image is almost certainly still lodged in your head.


Disney's Trump robot is as creepy as you'd expect

Mashable

Following protracted delays, a robotic version of Trump has been installed into Disney World's Hall of Presidents.


Inaugural speech is Trump's time to rise to the moment

Associated Press

President-elect Donald Trump speaks during the presidential inaugural Chairman's Global Dinner, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, in Washington. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during the presidential inaugural Chairman's Global Dinner, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, in Washington. Wayne Fields, a Washington University expert on presidential rhetoric, said Trump is in an awkward situation, going into his inaugural address as a man who seems to regard precise language with contempt "rather than respect." At the same time, Gerson cautions, Trump faces an extra hurdle in his inaugural address because he won the election by dividing the country.


Unifying inaugural speech tall order for Trump-the-disrupter known for later spoiler tweets

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – Tradition suggests it's time for Donald Trump to set aside the say-anything speaking style and rise to the inaugural moment. But bucking tradition, or ignoring it altogether, is what got Donald Trump to his inaugural moment. When Trump stands on the west front of the Capitol on Friday and delivers his inaugural address, all sides will be waiting to see whether he comes bearing a unifying message for a divided nation or decides to play up his persona as a disrupter of the established order. How Trump tends to that balancing act, in both style and content, will be a telling launch for his presidency. "The inaugural is an address that is meant for the ages," said Kathleen Hall Jamieson, a communications professor and director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.