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English vineyards hit by 'catastrophic' frost, wiping out half of harvest

BBC News

English winemakers have warned that at least half of this year's grape harvest has been wiped out by heavy frost. The air frost that hit last week caused "catastrophic" damage to buds that had bloomed earlier than usual thanks to a warm start to the year. About 75% of buds at Denbies Wine Estate in Surrey - which produces 500,000 bottles of wine a year - were affected, its chief executive said. England has 133 wineries, which produced five million bottles in 2015. Chris White, of Denbies, said the "catastrophic" damage had been "a blow".



How will the California fires impact wine?

Los Angeles Times

This aerial photo shows a lush vineyard next to a scorched wasteland near Vintners Inn, just north of Coffey Park, Sonoma County, near Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 12, 2017. This aerial photo shows a lush vineyard next to a scorched wasteland near Vintners Inn, just north of Coffey Park, Sonoma County, near Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 12, 2017. Napa and Sonoma's wine industry has lost its postcard image, replaced for now by scenes of char and death. How the region recovers depends heavily on the area's largest industry, which contributes $57 billion to the state economy, by some estimates. About 200,000 acres have burned since Sunday night in Napa, Sonoma, Lake and Mendocino counties.


Did vineyards keep wine country fire from getting worse?

Los Angeles Times

Christian Palmaz used hoes, shovels and rakes to keep flames from his family's 19th century vineyard estate home on the flanks of Mt. But he didn't have to worry about his vines. They're green, very much alive, and a stark contrast to more than 500 acres of oak, manzanita and grassland charred by the Atlas Peak fire as it tore across Palmaz's property.


How Vineyard Vines Uses Analytics to Win Over Customers

#artificialintelligence

When brothers Shep and Ian Murray cut their ties with Corporate America to start a little company on Martha's Vineyard in 1998, their motivation was clear: "We're making neck ties so we don't have to wear them." Little did they know that the business they founded, Vineyard Vines, would become a darling of the fashion industry and a household brand name around the country. Today, the company best known for its smiling pink whale logo offers much more than their signature neckwear. That "little" privately-held business has grown tremendously since its launch and currently has more than 90 physical retail locations and a highly successful eCommerce business. I met the team at Vineyard Vines while doing research about data-driven marketing technologies for my book, Marketing, Interrupted, and was able to learn firsthand about the company's beginnings, and what has made them so successful today.