Hacking just 1 in 10 cars could gridlock all of the roads in Manhattan

New Scientist

Although car hacking is rare, it can be done, giving attackers complete remote control of the vehicle. "We wanted to get a sense of the worst case scenario," says Skanda Vivek at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. He and his colleagues modelled what would happen if cars all over Manhattan suddenly came to a stop.


Atlanta to become testbed for self driving cars and buses

Daily Mail

Self-driving vehicles could begin tooling down a bustling Atlanta street full of cars, buses, bicyclists and college students, as the city vies with other communities nationwide to test the emerging technology. Atlanta would become one of the largest urban areas for testing self-driving vehicles if plans come together for a demonstration as early as September. Nationwide, 10 sites were designated last month as'proving grounds' for automated vehicles by the U.S. Department of Transportation. North Avenue is being eyed as a real-world proving ground for self-driving vehicles, one of several communities nationwide vying to be test sites for the emerging technology. They include North Carolina turnpikes, the eastern Iowa prairie and a Michigan site where World War II bombing aircraft were produced in a factory built by automobile pioneer Henry Ford.


Atlanta hopes to be among candidates for self-driving auto test tracks

The Japan Times

ATLANTA – Self-driving vehicles could begin tooling down a bustling Atlanta street full of cars, buses, bicyclists and college students, as the city vies with other communities nationwide to test the emerging technology. Atlanta would become one of the largest urban areas for testing self-driving vehicles if plans come together for a demonstration as early as September. Nationwide, 10 sites were designated last month as "proving grounds" for automated vehicles by the U.S. Department of Transportation. They include North Carolina turnpikes, the eastern Iowa prairie and a Michigan site where World War II bombing aircraft were produced in a factory built by automobile pioneer Henry Ford. Atlanta isn't on the list, but city officials nevertheless hope to make an impact.


Analysis The Driverless Car is Already Here. What Comes Next?: QuickTake

#artificialintelligence

Cars that can drive themselves have already logged millions of miles, but with a driver poised to take over if needed. Waymo, a branch of Alphabet, the parent company of Google, is offering commuters in Phoenix the ability to hail a Chrysler minivan without anyone behind the wheel. Audi expects to begin selling a version of its A8 sedan that can take over completely in traffic jams and similar situations. And next year, General Motors Co. has promised to put robot taxis into service. Decades in the making, the driverless dream holds the promise of drastically reducing deaths on the highway.


Analysts: Autonomous vehicles could drive 40x increase in wireless traffic

#artificialintelligence

Are autonomous cars the killer application for 5G? Morgan Stanley's analyst team thinks the answer could be yes. The firm's telecom analysts have combined their forecasting models with those of its automotive team, and the results show connected cars driving huge increases in mobile traffic. "AV data could increase global wireless traffic 40x over current levels, delivering a boost for Telcos comparable to the iPhone in 2007," the analysts wrote in a research note. "In our Base Case, 300 million AVs pay an average revenue per user of $25/month for data services (today's consumer average for mobile), driving a new $200 billion annual revenue stream for Global Telcos. In our Bull Case, we assume Telcos can capture a portion of the value created in the AV ecosystem, equating to $1.3 trillion annually from AV data – a sea change for Telco services, much like the arrival of the smartphone."