Role Models in AI: Ece Kamar – AI4ALL – Medium

#artificialintelligence

Meet Ece Kamar, a senior researcher at Microsoft who works on human-machine collaboration, AI systems in the real world, and issues around bias, robustness, reliability, and transparency in AI. Ece also co-authored the first report in a 100-year study of artificial intelligence, intended to provide a set of reflections about the field as it progresses. The report offers insights on where AI is headed, policy recommendations, and the importance of reflecting on fairness and transparency in the field. Ece believes that it's unlikely that important tasks will ever be fully automated, as human-AI partnerships will be complementary, rather than a relationship of replacement. See how Ece envisions the future of AI, how her academic exploration in college helped shape her career, and how she sees diversity as key to moving the field in a positive direction.


Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies Turing Test Transcript for Terminal 5

AI Magazine

Can machines think? Alan Turing's decades-old question still influences artificial intelligence because of the simple test he proposed in his article in Mind. In this article, "AI Magazine collects presentations about the first round of the classic Turing Test of machine intelligence, held November 8, 1991 at The Computer Museum, Boston. Robert Epstein, Director Emeritus, Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, and an adjunct professor of psychology, Boston University, University of Massachusetts (Amherst), and University of California (San Diego) summarizes some of the difficult issues during the planning of this first real-time competition, and describes the event. He then speculates about the future of the competition and about its significance to the AI community. Presented in tandem with Dr. Epstein's article is the actual transcript of session that won the Loebner Prize Competition -- Joseph Weintraub's computer program PC Therapist.


The Quest for the Thinking Computer

AI Magazine

Can machines think? Alan Turing's decades-old question still influences artificial intelligence because of the simple test he proposed in his article in Mind. In this article, "AI Magazine collects presentations about the first round of the classic Turing Test of machine intelligence, held November 8, 1991 at The Computer Museum, Boston. Robert Epstein, Director Emeritus, Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, and an adjunct professor of psychology, Boston University, University of Massachusetts (Amherst), and University of California (San Diego) summarizes some of the difficult issues during the planning of this first real-time competition, and describes the event. He then speculates about the future of the competition and about its significance to the AI community. Presented in tandem with Dr. Epstein's article is the actual transcript of session that won the Loebner Prize Competition -- Joseph Weintraub's computer program PC Therapist.


Are women in science any better off than in Ada Lovelace's day? Jess Wade

IOM3

In recognition of the fact that their obituary pages had been dominated by white men, in 2018 the New York Times published an obituary of the Countess Ada Lovelace. Alongside Grace Hopper and Katherine Johnson, Lovelace has become an icon for women in technology. So much so that the second Tuesday in October is recognised internationally as Ada Lovelace Day. Lovelace was from a wealthy background; her father was the poet Lord Byron and her mother, Anne Isabella Milbanke, the "princess of parallelograms", was a keen mathematician and social reformer. Social scientists of today would describe Lovelace as having high "science capital" – her well-connected parents meant her mentors and advisers were members of the British scientific elite, including the polymaths Mary Somerville and Charles Babbage.


Technical challenges in machine ethics

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Machine ethics offers an alternative solution for artificial intelligence (AI) safety governance. In order to mitigate risks in human-robot interactions, robots will have to comply with humanity's ethical and legal norms, once they've merged into our daily life with highly autonomous capability. In terms of technical challenges, there are still many open questions in machine ethics. For example, what is deontic logic and how can it be used for improving AI safety? How do we fashion the knowledge representation for ethical robots? These are all significant questions for us to investigate. In this interview, we invite Prof. Ronald C. Arkin to share his insights on robot ethics, with a focus on its technical aspects.