The world's first quantum software superstore--or so it hopes--is here

MIT Technology Review

In quantum computing, it's not just the computers themselves that are hard to build. They also need sophisticated quantum algorithms--specialized software that's tailored to get the best out of the machines. Alán Aspuru-Guzik has gained an impressive reputation in academic circles by developing these kinds of algorithms, and now he's taking them to a wider market. A Harvard University professor (who's moving to the University of Toronto) and a 2010 member of MIT Technology Review's Innovators under 35 list, he is the cofounder of a company called Zapata Computing, which launched today with $5.4 million in announced funding. Zapata's ultimate goal is to be a kind of quantum-algorithm superstore, offering a broad range of ready-made software that companies can use to tap the immense processing power quantum computers promise to deliver.


Machine Learning: Speeding up ML with Quantum Computers

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Quantum Machine Learning is the use of Quantum Computers to do Machine Learning. The Machine Learning techniques applied often are "classical" or do not significantly differ from standard Machine Learning, although the algorithms may be implemented to be optimized for quantum computing. Sabre Kais, professor of chemical physics at Purdue, said that "this is an exciting time to combine machine learning with quantum computing. Impressive progress has been made recently in building quantum computers, and quantum machine learning techniques will become powerful tools for finding new patterns in big data." Jörg Esser, theoretical physicist, wrote that "Quantum computing enables exponential increases in speed by harnessing the weirdness of quantum mechanics. The key challenge is to build robust systems at scale."


A startup uses quantum computing to boost machine learning

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A company in California just proved that an exotic and potentially game-changing kind of computer can be used to perform a common form of machine learning. The feat raises hopes that quantum computers, which exploit the logic-defying principles of quantum physics to perform certain types of calculations at ridiculous speeds, could have a big impact on the hottest area of the tech industry: artificial intelligence. Researchers at Rigetti Computing, a company based in Berkeley, California, used one of its prototype quantum chips--a superconducting device housed within an elaborate super-chilled setup--to run what's known as a clustering algorithm. Clustering is a machine-learning technique used to organize data into similar groups. Rigetti is also making the new quantum computer--which can handle 19 quantum bits, or qubits--available through its cloud computing platform, called Forest, today.


A startup uses quantum computing to boost machine learning

#artificialintelligence

A company in California just proved that an exotic and potentially game-changing kind of computer can be used to perform a common form of machine learning. The feat raises hopes that quantum computers, which exploit the logic-defying principles of quantum physics to perform certain types of calculations at ridiculous speeds, could have a big impact on the hottest area of the tech industry: artificial intelligence. Researchers at Rigetti Computing, a company based in Berkeley, California, used one of its prototype quantum chips--a superconducting device housed within an elaborate super-chilled setup--to run what's known as a clustering algorithm. Clustering is a machine-learning technique used to organize data into similar groups. Rigetti is also making the new quantum computer--which can handle 19 quantum bits, or qubits--available through its cloud computing platform, called Forest, today.


A startup uses quantum computing to boost machine learning

#artificialintelligence

A company in California just proved that an exotic and potentially game-changing kind of computer can be used to perform a common form of machine learning. The feat raises hopes that quantum computers, which exploit the logic-defying principles of quantum physics to perform certain types of calculations at ridiculous speeds, could have a big impact on the hottest area of the tech industry: artificial intelligence. Researchers at Rigetti Computing, a company based in Berkeley, California, used one of its prototype quantum chips--a superconducting device housed within an elaborate super-chilled setup--to run what's known as a clustering algorithm. Clustering is a machine-learning technique used to organize data into similar groups. Rigetti is also making the new quantum computer--which can handle 19 quantum bits, or qubits--available through its cloud computing platform, called Forest, today.