Intel Is Playing Catch Up With Nvidia And Qualcomm In $15 Billion Mobileye Acquisition

Forbes - Tech

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich, BMW CEO Harald Krueger, and Mobileye CTO and cofounder Amnon Shashua pose after a press conference in Munich on July 1, 2016. Intel started making lots of noise about the autonomous car market last year. But it's a long slog getting into a market like automotive, where it can take years to get designed into a vehicle. On Monday, the chip giant announced it would just buy its way into the market with a $15.3 billion acquisition of Mobileye, a leading provider of advanced driver assistant systems based in Israel. A massive consolidation spree is sweeping the semiconductor industry.


What happens when driverless car meets delivery robot at an intersection?

ZDNet

Just before Christmas last year, Telia and Ericsson opened a 5G pilot network on Tallinn University of Technology's campus. It's a permanent network, created for TalTech scientists and the local startup hub to test new applications that need next-generation technology. Its first trial was to stream live 4K video from the Christmas market in Tallinn, which according to Telia Estonia, was the first live 4K broadcast in the region. Although it will take some time until mobile end users in Estonia can start signing up for 5G, there are other areas where the technology is already being put to use. One exciting project that's now powered by Telia's 5G network is ISEAuto, the first self-driving vehicle built in Estonia.


Rise of the machines?

FOX News

But it could be a real threat, warn researchers at the recent World Economic Forum. Unlike today's drones, which are still controlled by human operators, autonomous weapons could potentially be programmed to select and engage targets on their own. "It was one of the concerns that we itemized last year," Toby Walsh, professor of artificial intelligence (AI) at the school of computer science and engineering at the University of New South Wales, told FoxNews.com. "Most of us believe that we don't have the ability to build ethical robots," he added. "What is especially worrying is that the various militaries around the world will be fielding robots in just a few years, and we don't think anyone will be building ethical robots."


Is Facebook Building An Autonomous Car?

#artificialintelligence

Today at the Frankfurt motor show, one of the biggest and most prestigious motor shows in the world, Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, spoke before German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Now what is Facebook and most importantly, Sheryl Sandberg doing at an automotive industry event? The obvious answer that comes to mind when one relates Facebook and the car industry is the billions of advertising dollars the industry spends on marketing and advertising. However, that does not seem to be Facebook's game plan, as highlighted by Sheryl and shown at their pavilion. Facebook seems to have a strategy of leveraging its capabilities in social marketing, AR & VR and interestingly, who would have thought of it, leveraging its advanced AI and deep learning capabilities to support the development of autonomous vehicles.


Weaponized drones. Machines that attack on their own. 'That day is going to come'

#artificialintelligence

Technicians and researchers are cautioning about the threat such technology poses for cybersecurity, that fundamentally important practice that keeps our computers and data -- and governments' and corporations' computers and data -- safe from hackers. In February, a study from teams at the University of Oxford and University of Cambridge warned that AI could be used as a tool to hack into drones and autonomous vehicles, and turn them into potential weapons. "Autonomous cars like Google's (Waymo) are already using deep learning, can already raid obstacles in the real world," Caspi said, "so raiding traditional anti-malware system in cyber domain is possible." Another study, by U.S. cybersecurity software giant Symantec, said that 978 million people across 20 countries were affected by cybercrime last year. Victims of cybercrime lost a total of $172 billion -- an average of $142 per person -- as a result, researchers said.