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US demands more security on international flights to US

Associated Press

The Homeland Security Department is set to announce new security measures Wednesday for international flights bound to the United States, which could lead to a lifting of a ban on laptops and other electronics from passenger cabins from certain airports. The Homeland Security Department is set to announce new security measures Wednesday for international flights bound to the United States, which could lead to a lifting of a ban on laptops and other electronics from passenger cabins from certain airports. WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Homeland Security Department is demanding that airlines around the world step up security measures for international flights bound for the United States or face the possibility of a total electronics ban for planes. Compliance with the new rules could lead to the lifting of a ban on laptops and other large electronics already in place for airlines flying to the United States from 10 airports in the Middle East and Africa.


US official mulling greatly expanded airplane laptop ban

Associated Press

FILE - In this Thursday, May 25, 2017, file photo, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly listens on Capitol Hill in Washington, while testifying before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on FY'18 budget. That would dramatically expand a ban announced in March that affects about 50 flights per day from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East. FILE - In this Thursday, May 25, 2017, file photo, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly listens on Capitol Hill in Washington, while testifying before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on FY'18 budget. WASHINGTON (AP) -- Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Sunday he's considering banning laptops from the passenger cabins of all international flights to and from the United States.


Homeland Security chief considers banning laptops on all flights to and from U.S.

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly said Sunday that he's considering banning laptop computers from the passenger cabins of all international flights to and from the United States. That would dramatically expand a ban announced in March that affects about 50 flights a day from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East. The current ban was put in place because of concerns about terrorist attacks. The ban forbids travelers from bringing laptops, tablets and certain other devices on board with them as carry-on items. All electronics bigger than a smartphone must be in checked luggage.


'FOX NEWS SUNDAY' DHS chief considers laptop ban for all flights into US

FOX News

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Sunday he's considering a ban on passengers carrying laptop computers on all international flights in and out of the United States. "I might," Kelly said on "Fox News Sunday." That's really the thing that they are obsessed with, the terrorists, the idea of knocking down an airplane in flight, particularly if it's a U.S. carrier, particularly if it's full of mostly U.S. folks." Since taking over the agency in January, Kelly has already limited laptops in airplane cabins. He instituted a ban in March on flights from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East.


homeland-demands-security-international-flights-u-s

PBS NewsHour

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly testifies before a Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Reuters WASHINGTON -- The Homeland Security Department is demanding that airlines around the world step up security measures for international flights bound for the United States or face the possibility of a total electronics ban for planes. Compliance with the new rules could lead to the lifting of a ban on laptops and other large electronics already in place for airlines flying to the United States from 10 airports in the Middle East and Africa. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly announced the rollout of the new rules Wednesday. The new rules will apply to roughly 180 foreign and U.S.-based airlines, flying from 280 cities in 105 countries, according to Homeland Security.