Google Brain Co-Founder Teams With Foxconn to Bring AI to Factories

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Consumers now experience AI mostly through image recognition to help categorize digital photographs and speech recognition that helps power digital voice assistants such as Apple Inc's Siri or Amazon.com But at a press briefing in San Francisco two days before Ng's Landing.ai In many factories, workers look over parts coming off an assembly line for defects. Ng showed a video in which a worker instead put a circuit board beneath a digital camera connected to a computer and the computer identified a defect in the part. Ng said that while typical computer vision systems might require thousands of sample images to become "trained," Landing.ai's


Flipboard on Flipboard

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Sexism is so deeply ingrained in the way we think about the world, we've actually passed it on to our computers, according to a new University of Virginia and University of Washington study. Artificial intelligence is more likely to label people who are cooking, shopping, and cleaning as women and people who are playing sports, coaching, and shooting as men. UVA computer science professor Vicente Ordóñez got the idea for the experiment when he noticed that his image-recognition software was associating photos of kitchens with women. After training software using two photo collections that researchers use to create image-recognition software, including one supported by Facebook and Microsoft, he and his colleagues found that not only do these collections contain gender bias--they multiply that bias when they pass it on to the software. The program these photo sets produced actually labeled a man a "woman" because he was standing by a stove.


Darpa Wants to Build an Image Search Engine out of DNA

WIRED

Most people use Google's search-by-image feature to either look for copyright infringement, or for shopping. See some shoes you like on a frenemy's Instagram? Search will pull up all the matching images on the web, including from sites that will sell you the same pair. In order to do that, Google's computer vision algorithms had to be trained to extract identifying features like colors, textures, and shapes from a vast catalogue of images. Luis Ceze, a computer scientist at the University of Washington, wants to encode that same process directly in DNA, making the molecules themselves carry out that computer vision work. And he wants to do it using your photos.


How Google is teaching computers to see

AITopics Original Links

Google's Hartmut Neven demonstrates his visual-search app by snapping a picture of a Salvador Dali clock in his office building. Google and other tech companies are racing to improve image-recognition software Computers can recognize some objects in images, but not all Google's engineering director predicts the technology will fully mature in 10 years Google's engineering director predicts the technology will fully mature in 10 years Santa Monica, California (CNN) -- Computers used to be blind, and now they can see. Thanks to increasingly sophisticated algorithms, computers today can recognize and identify the Eiffel Tower, the Mona Lisa or a can of Budweiser. Still, despite huge technological strides in the last decade or so, visual search has plenty more hurdles to clear. At this point, it would be quicker to describe the types of things an image-search engine can interpret instead of what it can't.


IBM created software using NYPD images that can search for people by SKIN COLOR, report claims

Daily Mail - Science & tech

From 2012 to 2016, the New York City Police Department supplied IBM with thousands of surveillance images of unaware New Yorkers for the development of software that could help track down people'of interest,' a shocking report claims. IBM's technology was designed to match stills of individuals with specific physical characteristics, including clothing color, age, gender, hair color, and even skin tone, according to The Intercept. Internal documents and sources involved with the program cited by the report reveal IBM released an early iteration of its video analytics software by 2013, before improving its capabilities over the following years. The report adds to growing concerns on the potential for racial profiling with advanced surveillance technology. From 2012 to 2016, the New York City Police Department supplied IBM with thousands of surveillance images of unaware New Yorkers for the development of software that could help track down people'of interest,' a shocking report claims According to the investigation by The Intercept and the Investigative Fund, the NYPD did not end up using IBM's analytics program as part of its larger surveillance system, and discontinued it by 2016.