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Machine Learning And Big Data Know It Wasn't You Who Just Swiped Your Credit Card

International Business Times

You're sitting at home minding your own business when you get a call from your credit card's fraud detection unit asking if you've just made a purchase at a department store in your city. It wasn't you who bought expensive electronics using your credit card – in fact, it's been in your pocket all afternoon. So how did the bank know to flag this single purchase as most likely fraudulent?


How Banks Use Machine Learning to Know a Crook's Using Your Credit Card Details

#artificialintelligence

You're sitting at home minding your own business when you get a call from your credit card's fraud detection unit asking if you've just made a purchase at a department store in your city. It wasn't you who bought expensive electronics using your credit card – in fact, it's been in your pocket all afternoon. So how did the bank know to flag this single purchase as most likely fraudulent? Credit card companies have a vested interest in identifying financial transactions that are illegitimate and criminal in nature. According to the Federal Reserve Payments Study, Americans used credit cards to pay for 26.2 billion purchases in 2012.


Machine learning and big data know it wasn't you who just swiped your credit card

#artificialintelligence

You're sitting at home minding your own business when you get a call from your credit card's fraud detection unit asking if you've just made a purchase at a department store in your city. It wasn't you who bought expensive electronics using your credit card – in fact, it's been in your pocket all afternoon. So how did the bank know to flag this single purchase as most likely fraudulent? Credit card companies have a vested interest in identifying financial transactions that are illegitimate and criminal in nature. According to the Federal Reserve Payments Study, Americans used credit cards to pay for 26.2 billion purchases in 2012.


Machine Learning and Big Data Know It Wasn't You Who Just Swiped Your Credit Card 7wData

@machinelearnbot

You're sitting at home minding your own business when you get a call from your Credit card's fraud detection unit asking if you've just made a purchase at a department store in your city. It wasn't you who bought expensive electronics using your Credit card -- in fact, it's been in your pocket all afternoon. So how did the bank know to flag this single purchase as most likely fraudulent?


The In-depth 2020 Guide to E-commerce Fraud Detection

#artificialintelligence

It is hard to underestimate the role of E-commerce in a world where most communications happen on the web and our virtual environment is full of advertisements with attractive products and services to buy. Meanwhile, it is obvious that many criminals are trying to take advantage of it, using scams and malware to compromise users' data. The level of E-commerce fraud is high, according to the statistics. With E-commerce sales estimated to reach $630 billion (or more) in 2020, an estimated $16 billion will be lost because of fraud. Amazon accounts for almost a third of all E-commerce deals in the United States; Amazon's sales numbers increase by about 15% to 20% each year. From 2018 to 2019, E-commerce spending increased by 57% -- the third time in U.S. history that the money spent shopping online exceeded the amount of money spent in brick-and-mortar stores. The Crowe UK and Centre for Counter Fraud Studies (CCFS) created Europe's most complete database of information on fraud, with data from more than 1,300 enterprises from almost every economic field.