Goto

Collaborating Authors

Can artificial Intelligence replace songwriters? Study on AI lyrics suggests it is possible

#artificialintelligence

In an age when artificial intelligence (AI) is touted to take over many jobs across various industries, songwriting would be the last thing coming to our minds -- after all, the best songs are about the human experience and how could a robot replicate that? However, a study by ticket marketplace TickPick analyzed whether AI could, in fact, replace songwriters and their findings might not please many. For the study, the AI software was trained just for five hours with lyrics across various genres, including pop, country, hip-hop and rock. Later, the AI-generated lyrics were then tested among 1,003 music fans via Amazon Mechanical Turk "with the intent of testing human ability to correctly identify AI-generated lyrics, as well as their opinion on creativity, emotionality and favorability of various lyrics presented to them." Models were trained between five and 12 hours after lyrics were taken from genius.com and grouped by genre.


AI-generated pop song puts human composers on notice

#artificialintelligence

Last year, Sony's Flow Machine software generated its first pop song, designed in the style of The Beatles. "I get to spend more time doing more of what I love – 'conducting' the AI to create a great song, writing lyrics and vocal melodies, and making music videos," explains Taryn regarding her production process. Amper initially developed its AI music composition system as a way for businesses and small content creators to add background music to their projects without delving into the messy world of royalties and licensing. Most are content to sit in the "muzak" world, generating music designed to play in the background of department stores or elevators, but it is clear that this technology can be used by amateur musicians as well.


51018

#artificialintelligence

Last year, Sony's Flow Machine software generated its first pop song, designed in the style of The Beatles. "I get to spend more time doing more of what I love – 'conducting' the AI to create a great song, writing lyrics and vocal melodies, and making music videos," explains Taryn regarding her production process. Amper initially developed its AI music composition system as a way for businesses and small content creators to add background music to their projects without delving into the messy world of royalties and licensing. Most are content to sit in the "muzak" world, generating music designed to play in the background of department stores or elevators, but it is clear that this technology can be used by amateur musicians as well.


This Software Can Make Kanye West Rap Eminem's 'Lose Yourself'

#artificialintelligence

We have taught computers to do some amazing and horrible things, as a species. But nothing summarizes both of these facets quite like a machine-learning-generated snippet of Kanye West rapping Eminem's "Lose Yourself" with what sounds like a mouthful of stockpiled quarantine Nutella. This is just one example of the thousands of cursed yet compelling song snippets generated by Jukebox, machine learning software developed by independent research organization Open AI and released to the world on Thursday. The fine details (which you can read in an accompanying paper) are complicated but the general idea is the researchers trained machine learning models capable of parsing music on audio from more than 1 million songs pulled from the web. From this fuzzy internal picture of what constitutes listenable music, Jukebox generates new songs in various genres and in the style of specific artists.


AI Song Contest

AIHub

The 2020 Eurovision Song Contest may have been cancelled, but fans of formulaic pop can still get their fill courtesy of the VPRO AI Song Contest. The contestants and their entries were revealed on 10 April and the public have until 10 May to cast their votes. Thirteen teams have entered, with the competition open to anyone residing in a country eligible to take part in the traditional Eurovision extravaganza. The contestants have used a variety of machine learning techniques to help create their songs, with the teams relying on computer input to different degrees. All artists were keen to stress that, rather than pressing a button and letting their trained algorithms create the entire piece, their work is a result of collaboration between AI and humans.