Google could soon get access to genetic patient data

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Artificial intelligence is already being put to use in the NHS, with Google's AI firm DeepMind providing technology to help monitor patients. And a new study suggests that Google could soon be meeting with Genomic England - a company set up by the Department of Health to sequence 100,000 genomes – to discuss whether DeepMind could get involved. In an article for The Conversation, Edward Hockings a researcher at the University of the West of Scotland, explains the risks of letting a private company gain access to sensitive genetic data. In Google's case, he says, it could allow them to target users with personalised advertising based on their preferences and health risks. It could also create profiles of people based on their DNA data, which may provide details such as their risk of becoming a criminal.


Stephen Hawking - Wikipedia

@machinelearnbot

Stephen William Hawking CH CBE FRS FRSA (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018)[14][15] was an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge.[16][17] His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.[18][19] Hawking was an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009 and achieved commercial success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book, A Brief History of Time, appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. Hawking had a rare early-onset slow-progressing form of motor neurone disease (also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Lou Gehrig's disease), that gradually paralysed him over the decades.[20][21] Even after the loss of his speech, he was still able to communicate through a speech-generating device, initially through use of a hand-held switch, and eventually by using a single cheek muscle. Hawking was born on 8 January 1942[22] in Oxford to Frank (1905–1986) and Isobel Hawking (née Walker; 1915–2013).[23][24] Despite their families' financial constraints, both parents attended the University of Oxford, where Frank read medicine and Isobel read Philosophy, Politics and Economics.[24] The two met shortly after the beginning of the Second World War at a medical research institute where Isobel was working as a secretary and Frank was working as a medical researcher.[24][26] They lived in Highgate; but, as London was being bombed in those years, Isobel went to Oxford to give birth in greater safety.[27] Hawking had two younger sisters, Philippa and Mary, and an adopted brother, Edward.[28] In 1950, when Hawking's father became head of the division of parasitology at the National Institute for Medical Research, Hawking and his family moved to St Albans, Hertfordshire.[29][30]


NHS cyber attack is worse than first feared

The Independent - Tech

The cyber attack that on the NHS is more widespread than initially feared. NHS Scotland has also been affected by the cyber attack, which is preventing hospital staff from accessing patient data. Ransomware called Wanna Decryptor appears to be at the heart of the problem, and is demanding payment to unlock infected machines. How much data has been accessed remains unclear for now, but security experts have warned that medical records can be much more valuable to criminals than financial data. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


NHS Hospitals Turn to Deep Learning and Advanced Algorithms to Fight Heart Disease

#artificialintelligence

WIRE)--New technology using deep learning and advanced algorithms to evaluate blood flow to the heart is now being used in English hospitals to fight against coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the leading causes of death in the UK. It is responsible for more than 66,000 deaths each year and it is estimated that 2.3 million people in the UK are currently living with the diseasei. CHD develops when the arteries leading to the heart narrow or become blocked, which can reduce blood flow, and cause chest pain and heart attacksii. The HeartFlow FFRct Analysis is being supported by NHS England as part of the Innovation and Technology Payment (ITP) programme to help physicians better diagnose coronary heart disease.


Amazon Alexa offering NHS health advice

#artificialintelligence

People will be able to get expert health advice using Amazon Alexa devices under a partnership with the NHS, the government has announced. From this week, the voice-assisted technology is automatically searching the NHS Choices website when UK users ask for health-related advice. Previously the device provided information from a range of sources. The Department of Health in England said it could provide valuable support and even reduce demand on the NHS. The partnership was first announced last year and now talks are under way with other companies, including Microsoft, to set up similar arrangements.