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Ceres becomes more mysterious with new specatular images

Christian Science Monitor | Science

Scientists with NASA's Dawn mission released new, close-up photos of Ceres on Tuesday at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas. Low-orbit images of the dwarf planet located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter were highly anticipated because of what they could potentially say about the Occator Crater. Bright spots on Ceres have perplexed scientists since NASA's Dawn mission sent images of them back last year. And measuring 57 miles across and 2.5 miles deep, Occator Crater holds the brightest area on the entire planet. The new images taken 240 miles from Ceres' surface – Dawn's lowest-altitude orbit – did not disappoint.


Ceres becomes even more mysterious with new specatular images

Christian Science Monitor | Science

Scientists with NASA's Dawn mission released new, close-up photos of Ceres on Tuesday at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas. Low-orbit images of the dwarf planet located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter were highly anticipated because of what they could potentially say about the Occator Crater. Bright spots on Ceres have perplexed scientists since NASA's Dawn mission sent images of them back last year. And measuring 57 miles across and 2.5 miles deep, Occator Crater holds the brightest area on the entire planet. The new images taken 240 miles from Ceres' surface – Dawn's lowest-altitude orbit – did not disappoint.


Spectacular Ceres images deepen mystery of dwarf planet's geology

Christian Science Monitor | Science

Scientists with NASA's Dawn mission released closeup photos of Ceres on Tuesday at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas. Low-orbit images of the dwarf planet located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter were highly anticipated because of what they could potentially say about the Occator Crater. Bright spots on Ceres have perplexed scientists since NASA's Dawn mission sent images of them back last year. And measuring 57 miles across and 2.5 miles deep, Occator Crater holds the brightest area on the entire planet. The new images taken 240 miles from Ceres' surface – Dawn's lowest-altitude orbit – did not disappoint.


The strange glowing 'spots' of Ceres seen up close in images

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Nasa's Dawn spacecraft has dipped closer than ever to Ceres, capturing the most detailed images yet of the mysterious bright spots on the dwarf planet. The latest images capture two giant craters up close, called Haulani and Oxo. They show evidence the impacts that formed them are fresh - and even show the giant landslides at the crater's rim they caused. Ceres' Haulani Crater, with a diameter of 21 miles (34 kilometers), shows evidence of landslides from its crater rim. This image was made using data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft when it was in its high-altitude mapping orbit, at a distance of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers) from Ceres.


Ceres' Intriguing Bright Spots Revealed In Unprecedented Detail By NASA's Dawn Spacecraft

International Business Times

Since March 2015, when NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered into orbit around Ceres -- a dwarf planet in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter -- a clump of bright spots on its surface has mystified scientists. Now, in some of the most detailed images of ceres' surface ever taken, this region -- known as the Occator Crater -- has been laid bare. The images, captured by Dawn from a height of 240 miles, reveal a dome, crisscrossed by several linear features and fractures, in a smooth-walled pit in the bright center of the crater. Prominent fractures are also seen surrounding the dome, running through smaller, bright regions found within the crater. According to the authors of an earlier study, the bright spots are most likely exposed inorganic salts -- a type of magnesium sulphate called hexahydrite.