After Win in China, AlphaGo's Designers Explore New AI

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After winning its three-game match against Chinese grandmaster Ke Jie, the world's top Go player, AlphaGo is retiring. Demis Hassabis, the CEO and founder of DeepMind, the Google artificial intelligence lab that built this historic machine, tells WIRED he will now move the machine's designers to other projects. "This is some of the top people in the company," Hassabis says. "The idea is to really explore what we can do in other domains." Considering the world-shaking success of AlphaGo, that is a very powerful idea.


AlphaGo victory raises concerns over use of artificial intelligence on stock market

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When Google's AlphaGo program beat grandmaster Lee Se-Dol four games to one, both programmers and professional Go players were surprised. The general consensus was that it would be years before a computer could defeat a human at the complex board game, which players describe as requiring elegance and imagination. Director of the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development and electrical engineering professor, Jon Tapson, said AlphaGo's victory was cause for a re-evaluation of how we use artificial intelligence (AI). "They could find ways of manipulating the stock market -- maybe by buying and selling shares in rapid succession to create the illusion of a change in market sentiment," he said. He said unless there was reason to go looking, it was unlikely humans would notice that kind of behaviour, and that it would be difficult to program or regulate the actions of an AI if we do not know how it makes decisions.


Google Beating Grandmaster Sedol Is Bigger Than IBM Beating Kasparov - Singularity HUB

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It's been an emotional week in the realm of game AI as the world watched the historic five-game showdown between legendary Go world champion Lee Sedol and Google DeepMind's famed deep learning AI AlphaGo. All five games were held at the Four Seasons Hotel in Seoul, South Korea, and as events played out, millions around the world became increasingly captivated. Anticipation for the match began growing in January, when Google's UK-based AI group DeepMind, led by CEO Demis Hassabis, announced their computer algorithm AlphaGo defeated three-time European Go champion Fan Hui 5 games to 0--a victory some experts didn't expect a computer to achieve for a decade. At the end of a Google blog post announcing the win was the promise of a best-of-five face-off between AlphaGo and 18-time international Go champion Lee Sedol, a match equivalent to IBM's Deep Blue defeat of Garry Kasparov in chess in 1997. Notably, Go is inherently more complex than chess and AlphaGo, at least in part, trained itself to play the game.


After Win in China, AlphaGo's Designers Explore New AI

#artificialintelligence

After winning its three-game match against Chinese grandmaster Ke Jie, the world's top Go player, AlphaGo is retiring. Demis Hassabis, the CEO and founder of DeepMind, the Google artificial intelligence lab that built this historic machine, tells WIRED he will now move the machine's designers to other projects. "This is some of the top people in the company," Hassabis says. "The idea is to really explore what we can do in other domains." Considering the world-shaking success of AlphaGo, that is a very powerful idea.


When AI Tech Turned a Corner -- Google's Deep Mind AlphaGo Beating Lee Sedol

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I meant to write this blog several months ago. However as a compulsive procrastinator I kept putting it to another day, until today. On January 27, an article in Nature reported on a computer that had beat a human player at Go. It is an ancient board game that has long been viewed as a hard nut to crack for Artificial Intelligence (AI). Till then, computers had already beaten the best human players of backgammon, draughts, and chess.