Twenty-one U.S. states notified by federal government they were targets of election hacking

The Japan Times

NEW YORK – The federal government Friday told election officials in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems before last year's presidential election. The notification came roughly a year after Department of Homeland Security officials first said states were targeted by hacking efforts possibly connected to Russia. The states that told AP they had been targeted included some key political battlegrounds, such as Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin.


Hackers targeted election systems in 21 states, federal government says

PBS NewsHour

The federal government is telling election officials in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems last year, although in most cases the systems were not breached. The federal government is telling election officials in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems last year, although in most cases the systems were not breached. States that told The Associated Press they had been targeted include Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Maryland, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. In most cases, they had not known until notified Friday by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Homeland Security officials tell the AP that in September hackers believed to be Russian agents targeted voter registration systems in more than 20 states.


DHS finally reveals the states Russia hacked during the elections

Engadget

State officials finally know if they serve one of the 21 states Russia tried to hack during the 2016 Presidential elections. Homeland Security and other agencies found out in 2016 that Russian government hackers tried to get into some states' voting registration systems, but it took a year for the secretaries of state to convince the DHS to disclose its findings. The agency has only decided to tell authorities if they were targeted during the elections on Friday, because it "would help [them] make security decisions" way before the 2018 midterm elections begin. Senator Mark R. Warner, vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said: "Its unacceptable that it took almost a year after the election to notify states that their elections systems were targeted, but I'm relieved that DHS has acted upon our numerous requests and is finally informing the top elections officials in all 21 affected states that Russian hackers tried to breach their systems in the run up to the 2016 election." The states affected by the hacking attempts include Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Wisconsin and Washington.


Russians tried to hack election systems of 21 states in 2016, Wisconsin officials say

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

In preparation for the midterms, some states are ditching electronic voting machines for paper ballots, and it's all thanks to Russia. The Department of Homeland Security says that Wisconsin was among the states where Russians tried to hack elections in 2016. Officials said the attempts failed in Wisconsin. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security notified states of the attempted breaches on Friday, said Michael Haas, director of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. The attempt in Wisconsin was unsuccessful, he said.


Hackers targeted 21 US states during 2016 election

Al Jazeera

US officials have told election authorities in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems before last year's presidential election. The notification came roughly a year after the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) first said states were targeted by hacking efforts possibly connected to Russia, prompting criticism by some politicians for the delayed disclosure. The states that told The Associated Press news agency that they had been targeted included some key political battlegrounds, such as Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin. The other states that confirmed they were contacted were Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas and Washington. Being targeted does not mean that sensitive voter data was manipulated or results were changed.