How the brain recognizes what the eye sees

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Now, Salk Institute researchers have analyzed how neurons in a critical part of the brain, called V2, respond to natural scenes, providing a better understanding of vision processing. The work is described in Nature Communications on June 8, 2017. "Understanding how the brain recognizes visual objects is important not only for the sake of vision, but also because it provides a window on how the brain works in general," says Tatyana Sharpee, an associate professor in Salk's Computational Neurobiology Laboratory and senior author of the paper. "Much of our brain is composed of a repeated computational unit, called a cortical column. In vision especially we can control inputs to the brain with exquisite precision, which makes it possible to quantitatively analyze how signals are transformed in the brain."


Do YOU count on your fingers? Experts say it could actually boost your brainpower and turn you into a genius

Daily Mail - Science & tech

During a lab meeting, one of our PhD researchers recalls how her father would forbid her from using paper to help solve maths homework problems by writing them down. Another admits that she sometimes still uses her hands to make small calculations, although she does so while hiding them behind her back. When we realise that all of us use our fingers in order to answer demands for the'third, fifth, and seventh digits' of our secret online banking password, we laugh in relief. We are not so daft after all, or at least we are not alone. Consider a game of Scrabble, the researchers say.


How a Defense of Christianity Revolutionized Brain Science - Facts So Romantic

Nautilus

Presbyterian reverend Thomas Bayes had no reason to suspect he'd make any lasting contribution to humankind. Born in England at the beginning of the 18th century, Bayes was a quiet and questioning man. He published only two works in his lifetime. In 1731, he wrote a defense of God's--and the British monarchy's--"divine benevolence," and in 1736, an anonymous defense of the logic of Isaac Newton's calculus. Yet an argument he wrote before his death in 1761 would shape the course of history.


How a Defense of Christianity Revolutionized Brain Science - Facts So Romantic

Nautilus

Presbyterian reverend Thomas Bayes had no reason to suspect he'd make any lasting contribution to humankind. Born in England at the beginning of the 18th century, Bayes was a quiet and questioning man. He published only two works in his lifetime. In 1731, he wrote a defense of God's--and the British monarchy's--"divine benevolence," and in 1736, an anonymous defense of the logic of Isaac Newton's calculus. Yet an argument he wrote before his death in 1761 would shape the course of history.


Looking to the human brain to improve artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The brain makes sense of the world by collecting information from the eyes, processing this via neuronal networks and then recognizing objects and places based on what is stored in the brain's memory. This process has not been well-understood and the lack of clarity is one of the barriers to replicating this process in computer systems, where the aim is to advance artificial intelligence systems. A new study from the Salk Institute has looked at neurons in a part of the brain called V2. Visual area (V2) is the second major area in the visual cortex, and the first region within the visual association area of the brain. This area receives connections from the thalamus, which is in the primary visual cortex (or Visual area one). Area V2 also sends strong feedback connections to V1.