Prospects for a Deep Learning Health Care System

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In 1976, Maxmen1 predicted that artificial intelligence (AI) in the 21st century would usher in "the post-physician era," with health care provided by paramedics and computers. Today, the mass extinction of physicians remains unlikely. However, as outlined by Hinton2 in a related Viewpoint, the emergence of a radically different approach to AI, called deep learning, has the potential to effect major changes in clinical medicine and health care delivery.


How Artificial Intelligence Could Humanize Health Care

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Using artificial intelligence in health care could actually make medicine more human by giving doctors more time to interact with their patients. The technology promises to improve health care by making it more effective and speedy by eliminating some of the mundane functions that eat up doctors' time, said Eric Topol, founder and director of the nonprofit Scripps Research Translational Institute, at Fortune's Brainstorm Health conference on Tuesday in San Diego. Machine learning could free doctors from having to type medical information into patient files while also helping give patients better access to their personal data. "All that effort can then get us to what we've been missing for decades now, which is the true care in health care," Topol said. Topol's vision is the topic of his new book, Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again.


Four Lessons In The Adoption Of Machine Learning In Health Care

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The March issue of Health Affairs demonstrates the potential of health care delivery system innovation to improve value for both patients and clinicians. Technology innovations such as machine learning and artificial intelligence systems are promising breakthroughs to improve diagnostic accuracy, tailor treatments, and even eventually replace work performed by clinicians, especially that of radiologists and pathologists. Machine-learning systems infer patterns, relationships, and rules directly from large volumes of data in ways that can far exceed human cognitive capacities. As the computational underpinning of tools such as e-mail spam filters, product and content recommendations, targeted advertisements, and, more recently, autonomous vehicles, machine learning is already ubiquitous in many economic sectors. Yet, machine-learning applications are still used sparingly today in the delivery of care.


Cracking the Internal Health Code with Deep Learning - THINK Blog

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The endoscope and colonoscope were first developed in 1880s to look inside the body. Specialists use their expertise and experience to examine the medical images. But sometimes, human error and backend issues can result in misdiagnosis. Population increase and more cases of internal diseases are overloading the medical industry in many major cities in the world. In turn, the demand of medical specialists continues to soar.


Datapalooza Panelists Address Implications of Artificial Intelligence Healthcare Informatics Magazine Health IT

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One of the more interesting panels at last week's Health Datapalooza featured four speakers involved in the application of artificial intelligence to healthcare, including the creation of predictive models. In areas involving massive amounts of information in the diagnostic and genomic space, machine learning is already in use today, and the FDA is starting to approve applications of deep learning. For instance, a company called Arterys recently won FDA approval for its Cardio DL application, which uses deep learning to automate time-consuming analyses and tasks that are performed manually by clinicians today. Although they each come at it from a different angle based on their company's focus, there were several overarching themes the Datapalooza panelists tackled about the application of algorithms in healthcare, including the importance of transparency to getting clinician engagement. Getting buy-in from clinicians is a huge challenge, said Eric Just, a senior vice president for product development at Health Catalyst, which builds analytics and decision support tools for its health system customers.