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Our Inevitable Future: A Conversation With Kevin Kelly About VR, Digital Socialism, And His New Book

#artificialintelligence

If you're a virtual reality enthusiast, you probably read Kevin Kelly's April Wired cover story on Magic Leap, "The World's Most Secretive Startup." Kelly is one of the few people who've seen the much-hyped mixed reality technology being produced by the Fort Lauderdale company and was suitably impressed by it. "While Magic Leap has yet to achieve the immersion of The Void," he wrote (referring to the Utah-based immersive experience company), "it is still, by far, the most impressive on the visual front -- the best at creating the illusion that virtual objects truly exist." As the co-founder of Wired, publisher of the Cool Tools website, and former publisher and editor of The Whole Earth Review, Kelly has always been prescient about these things. In his new book, The Inevitable: Understanding 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future, he compellingly outlines a set of behaviors and trends that will change the way we live. We recently spoke with Kelly about the themes of the book, and of course, the latest developments in VR. There Is Only R: The first question I have to ask: what do you think of the Pokemon Go phenomenon? Given what you've written about the VR and AR, what's your take on it? Kevin Kelly: I think it's just wonderfully thrilling to see -- I think perhaps the only unexpected thing about it is its apparent suddenness.


What It's Actually Like to Use Magic Leap's Secretive Technology

TIME - Tech

Wired on Tuesday published a behind-the-scenes look at Magic Leap, a secretive, Google-backed startup working on so-called "mixed reality," or MR. Unlike virtual reality, which generates entirely digital worlds for users to explore, mixed reality efforts seek to overlay computer graphics onto the physical environment around us. Magic Leap has been generally flying under the radar, save for a few short videos supposedly showing off what it's like to use the company's early technology. Wired's Kevin Kelly got some hands-on time with Magic Leap's latest hardware and had this to say: In trying out Magic Leap's prototype, I found that it worked amazingly well close up, within arm's reach, which was not true of many of the other mixed- and virtual-reality systems I used. I also found that the transition back to the real world while removing the Magic Leap's optics was effortless, as comfortable as slipping off sunglasses, which I also did not experience in other systems.


Jaron Lanier Q&A: VR Visionary and Author of 'Dawn of the New Everything'

WIRED

Jaron Lanier may not have sired the term virtual reality--that honor generally goes to French playwright Antonin Artaud in 1938--but he's one hell of a father figure. As the founder of legendary VR company VPL Research, he both popularized the term and helped create most of the enduring icons of early VR, from The Lawnmower Man's snazzy headset and gear to the ill-fated Nintendo Power Glove. Now, 25 years after stepping away from the VR field, Lanier has re entered the alternate universe he so famously evangelized. His new book, Dawn of the New Everything, is part coming-of-age chronicle (he lived with his father in a DIY geodesic dome), part swinging Silicon Valley memoir (rich anecdotes from his time at VPL), and it's stuffed with enough fantastical soothsaying to fill a Holodeck.


Google-backed Magic Leap's new demo gives glimpse into secret technology

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new demo from the mysterious startup Magic Leap gives a glimpse into what your mornings could be like in a'mixed reality' future. Shot through the view of the Magic Leap technology, the video shows how the headset can bring typically screen-based tasks to life before the user's eyes. Everest to jellyfish drifting through the air, the tech has promise to revolutionize computing – but no one really knows what it will look like yet. A new demo from the mysterious startup Magic Leap gives a glimpse into what your mornings could be like in a'mixed reality' future. Shot through the view of the Magic Leap technology, the video shows how the headset can bring typically screen-based tasks to life before the user's eyes In October, Magic Leap announced it had raised 542 million in funding, led by Google.


Move over Microsoft: Patents suggest Google-backed Magic Leap may be releasing a Star Wars-style VR headset

Daily Mail - Science & tech

More details have come to light on the virtual reality plans of a secretive technology firm which has gained huge backing from Google. Florida-based start-up Magic Leap has filed for a patent for a VR headset, which looks like it would be at home on the head of an X-Wing pilot. Magic Leap released sparse details of its'mixed reality' system earlier this year, where the user can see through the glass display – unlike pure VR headsets, such as Oculus Rift or HTC Vive. A demo released by Magic Leap in April, the firm offered a glimpse into what the mixed reality technology could offer. It would enable users to see through the display, augmented with information - similar to Microsoft's Hololens.