Deadly Tesla crash exposes confusion over automated driving

PBS NewsHour

A Tesla Model S electric vehicle is shown in San Francisco, California, U.S., April 7, 2016. How much do we really know about what so-called self-driving vehicles can and cannot do? The fatal traffic accident involving a Tesla Motors car that crashed while using its Autopilot feature offers a stark reminder that such drivers are in uncharted territory--and of the steep cost of that uncertainty. The sensor systems that enable Tesla's hands-free driving are the result of decades of advances in computer vision and machine learning. Yet the failure of Autopilot -- built into 70,000 Tesla vehicles worldwide since October 2014 -- to help avoid the May 7 collision that killed the car's sole occupant demonstrates how far the technology has to go before fully autonomous vehicles can truly arrive.


Deadly Tesla Crash Exposes Confusion over Automated Driving

AITopics Original Links

How much do we really know about what so-called self-driving vehicles can and cannot do? The fatal traffic accident involving a Tesla Motors car that crashed while using its Autopilot feature offers a stark reminder that such drivers are in uncharted territory--and of the steep cost of that uncertainty. The sensor systems that enable Tesla's hands-free driving are the result of decades of advances in computer vision and machine learning. Yet the failure of Autopilot--built into 70,000 Tesla vehicles worldwide since October 2014--to help avoid the May 7 collision that killed the car's sole occupant demonstrates how far the technology has to go before fully autonomous vehicles can truly arrive. The crash occurred on a Florida highway when an 18-wheel tractor-trailer made a left turn in front of a 2015 Tesla Model S that was in Autopilot mode and the car failed to apply the brakes, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)--which is investigating--said in a preliminary report.


Report Reveals Poor Performance in Driver-Assistance Technologies - Connected World

#artificialintelligence

Each year, thousands of people lose their lives crossing the street. When drivers don't expect to see pedestrians, sometimes they just don't see them, even though they're there. Other times, pedestrians make poor choices, like crossing the road in the dark, which leads to accidents and, sometimes, tragic deaths. One of the key selling points for future AVs as well as today's connected vehicle-safety systems is that they're safer than human drivers driving without help. However, a new study suggests the industry still has a way to go before this is truly the case.


Rethinking Autonomous Vehicles

#artificialintelligence

Nearly three-quarters of Americans are afraid to ride in self-driving cars, according to the latest survey by the American Automobile Association. There is bad news ahead for the many automobile and technology companies currently developing, and road-testing, self-driving cars: many people are too frightened to ride in driverless vehicles. The American Automobile Association (AAA) May consumer trust survey on autonomous vehicles (AVs) found that 73% of U.S. citizens now fear traveling in an AV, compared with 63% just six months before. In addition, the survey found that two-thirds of millennials--a supposedly tech-loving generation--are also too fearful to ride in self-driving cars. The AAA even has unwelcome news from pedestrians and cyclists, with nearly two-thirds saying they don't trust AVs enough to use roads and sidewalks alongside them.


New Australian regulations to support driverless vehicles

ZDNet

Australian road traffic authorities can begin the roll out of intelligent transport systems (ITS) that enable vehicle-to-vehicle, vehicle-to-person, or vehicle-to-infrastructure communications, thanks to new regulations introduced by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) on Thursday.