Under pressure from allies, U.S. eases way for exemptions on just-imposed steel, aluminum tariffs

The Japan Times

President Donald Trump, who has broad powers to impose the tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on aluminum, at the outset granted exemptions to Canada and Mexico, and said there would be the possibility of industry exemptions, although he has not been specific. After Trump opened the door Australia, Brazil, Japan, South Korea and Europe clamored for special treatment, while Chinese producers called on Beijing to retaliate in kind. Trump said Friday he had spoken with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and that they are working on an agreement so Australia will not be subject to U.S. tariffs on the metals. "He is committed to having a very fair and reciprocal military and trade relationship," Trump said on Twitter, referring to Turnbull. "Working very quickly on a security agreement so we don't have to impose steel or aluminum tariffs on our ally, the great nation of Australia," Trump said.


No easy remedy for US-China tensions

Al Jazeera

The G20 Summit will kick off in Argentina on November 30 with most eyes focused on tensions between the United States and China over a range of trade and security issues. Under the administration of President Donald Trump, Washington has taken a harder line towards Beijing, especially on trade, and has insisted that the pressure will not relent until China comes to the table with a deal that addresses long-running concerns. The US president has played up his upcoming meeting with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping as Beijing's chance to make concessions necessary for the lifting of a series of punishing tariffs put on China earlier this year. I know it better than everybody knows it. My gut is always right.


Trump's policies on trade, climate and the U.N. push China toward EU

The Japan Times

BRUSSELS/BEIJING – China has launched a charm offensive with the European Union since U.S. President Donald Trump took office, shifting its stance on trade negotiations and signaling closer cooperation on a range of other issues, European diplomats say. European envoys in Brussels and Beijing sense a greater urgency from China to find allies willing to stand up for globalization amid fears that Trump could undermine it with his protectionist "America First" policies. "Trump is pushing China and Europe together," said one Beijing-based diplomat, citing Chinese support for trade, combating climate change and the United Nations -- all areas where the new U.S. president is seeking a change of tack. Four senior EU diplomats and officials in close contact with the Chinese said they also see a chance for a breakthrough on business issues that have been moving slowly for years, including a special treaty to increase investment flows. EU business groups are more skeptical, expressing growing dissatisfaction -- like their U.S. counterparts -- with limited market access in China and pressing for a firmer response.


Beijing cozies up to EU in wake of Trump's 'America First' policy

The Japan Times

BRUSSELS/BEIJING – China has launched a charm offensive with the European Union since U.S. President Donald Trump took office in January, shifting its stance on trade negotiations and signaling closer cooperation on a range of other issues, European diplomats say. European envoys in Brussels and Beijing sense a greater urgency from China to find allies willing to stand up for globalization amid fears that Trump could undermine it with his protectionist "America First" policies. "Trump is pushing China and Europe together," said one Beijing-based diplomat, citing Chinese support for trade, combating climate change and the United Nations -- all areas where the new U.S. president is seeking a change of tack. Four senior EU diplomats and officials in close contact with the Chinese said they also see a chance for a breakthrough on business issues that have been moving slowly for years, including a special treaty to increase investment flows. EU business groups are more skeptical, expressing growing dissatisfaction -- like their U.S. counterparts -- with limited market access in China and pressing for a firmer response.


The global implications of Trump's trade war

Al Jazeera

True to his word, the United States President Donald Trump fired the opening shots of a likely trade war. His primary target is none other than China, the world's leading trading nation, which is well on its way to becoming the world's biggest economy in coming years. In late March, the American president targeted imports from China, which have dramatically expanded in recent years. Up to $60bn in Chinese exports now hang in the balance, as the US ramps up tariffs against major trading partners. Trump is also considering additional restrictions on Chinese investments in America.