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Ottobock Reaches for Growth With Industrial Exoskeletons

U.S. News

Exoskeletons were developed for medical and military use. But as workers age, sales of exoskeletons for industry are forecast to rise to $1.76 billion in 2028 from $67.29 million this year, according Rian Whitton, an analyst at technology market intelligence firm ABI Research.


China's working on the next generation of military exoskeleton. Here's what it can do.

Popular Science

China's push to develop powered exoskeletons has implications for almost every area of combat operations. If the plans prove successful, Chinese infantry and special operators could not only carry heavier equipment for longer distances, but also attach body armor to individuals. None of which can fly like Iron Man.


Prediction: You'll see a whole bunch of people wearing robots at work in 2018

ZDNet

It's been a long, rocky road for powered robotic exoskeletons ... most of which are still incapable of walking down long and rocky roads.


LG adds an exoskeleton to its line of CLOi robots

Engadget

Today, LG announced that it will reveal its first robotic exoskeleton at IFA 2018, which takes place in Berlin from August 31st to September 5th. The exoskeleton, called LG CLOi SuitBot, is designed to support a user's legs to allow for more limb strength This robot differs from the others that LG has announced because it is a robotic exoskeleton that you can wear, not a robot. It features rotating joints and sandal-type shoes with automatic adjustments, which help users enter and exit the exoskeleton more easily. It's designed to be a comfortable fit and provide natural enhancement while walking, standing and working. It can give people who lift heavy objects or operate heavy tools a boost.


EduExo: Robotic exoskeletons for everyone

Robohub

For decades robotic exoskeletons were the subject of science fiction novels and movies. But in recent years, exoskeleton technology has made huge progress towards reality and exciting research projects and new companies have surfaced. Typical applications of today's exoskeletons are stroke therapy or support of users with a spinal cord injury, or industrial applications, such as back support for heavy lifting or power tool operation. And while the field is growing quickly, it is currently not easy to get involved. Learning materials or exoskeleton courses or classes are not widely available yet.