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Automation could make 12 million jobs redundant. Here's who's most at risk

ZDNet

Automation will replace some jobs, but also create new ones. Up to a third of jobs in Europe could be made redundant by automation over the next 20 years as companies battle to increase productivity and fill skills gaps created by an ageing population, according to Forrester. The tech analyst's latest Future of Jobs Forecast estimates that as many as 12 million jobs could be lost to automation across Europe by 2040, primarily impacting workers in industries such as retail, food services, and leisure and hospitality. Mid-skill labour jobs that consist of simple, routine tasks are most at risk from automation, the report said. These roles make up 38% of the workforce in Germany, 34% of the workforce in France, and 31% of the workforce in the UK. In total, 49 million jobs in'Europe-5' (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK) face being lost to automation, according to Forrester.


How Upskilling Can Help Offset Job Losses from AI

#artificialintelligence

Over the past year, there have been many discussion, blogs and conferences focused on the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) into the digital workforce. There have also been many commentators predicting the loss of hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of jobs as AI gains ground. One of most favored solutions to this threat is retraining. Amazon's recent announcement, pledging to upskill its workforce, supports this trending solution. Amazon said it will invest over $700 million to retrain employees who may be automated out of a job.


Council Post: Three Crucial Alignments To Enable Success In Automation And AI Initiatives

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Stephen Chen is Senior Vice President, Technology & Security, for NuCompass Mobility, a global relocation management company. Covid-19 and efforts to eradicate it will have a lasting impact on both employers and employees worldwide. As the U.S. and other countries recover, it's clear that the way we work has changed significantly and permanently. As they struggle with labor shortages, many companies are turning to automation because it's impossible to hire their way out of the situation. According to Forrester's Predictions, 2021: "Advances in AI, changes to work patterns, and a fierce global recession have made this drive for automation inevitable -- and irreversible."


10 imperatives for Europe in the age of AI and automation

#artificialintelligence

Europe, while making progress, is behind the US and China in capturing the opportunities of artificial intelligence and automation. Digitization is everywhere, but adoption is uneven across companies, sectors, and economies, and the leaders are capturing most of the benefits. Accelerating progress in AI and automation now bring further opportunities for users, businesses, and the economy. Europe, while making progress, is behind the United States and China. This briefing looks at how Europe could capture the digital opportunity and, at the same time, prepare for the future of work. Digital technologies have been evolving and disrupting the way we live, work, and organize for years.


10 imperatives for Europe in the age of AI and automation

#artificialintelligence

Europe, while making progress, is behind the US and China in capturing the opportunities of artificial intelligence and automation. Digitization is everywhere, but adoption is uneven across companies, sectors, and economies, and the leaders are capturing most of the benefits. Accelerating progress in AI and automation now bring further opportunities for users, businesses, and the economy. Europe, while making progress, is behind the United States and China. This briefing note was prepared for the European Union Heads of State Tallinn Digital Summit, which brought together heads of state and CEOs to discuss the steps needed to enable people, enterprises, and governments to fully tap into the potential of innovative technologies and digitization. Digital technologies have been evolving and disrupting the way we live, work, and organize for years.