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New Computer Coding Program Boasts No Courses or Professors

U.S. News

Earlier this year, the president included in his fiscal 2017 budget proposal a 4 billion request to make computer science a new "basic skill." The Education Department is prioritizing coding programs through a new experiment that allows students to tap federal financial aid to help pay for them. The private sector is prioritizing the issue as well, pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into increased access to computers, computer science and broadband internet. Even toy manufacturers are getting in on it, dreaming up toys aimed at teaching children as young as 3 to think like a computer coder.


Could Quantum Computing Be the End of Free Will?

The Atlantic - Technology

Faster, more powerful computing has the potential to revolutionize fields from drug delivery to freight transportation. But some are also worried that the computers of the future could also upend what it means to be human. Quantum computing capitalizes on the quantum-physics principle that a particle may be in two states at once, as long as it does not leave a record of either state. Unlike traditional computers, which are made of bits restrained to values of zero or one, a quantum computer would allow bits to have both values simultaneously, which would lead to much faster, more powerful processing. According to Mordechai Segev, a professor of physics at Technion Israel Institute of Technology, a functional, accurate quantum computer would need to consist of about 2,000 quantum bits.


A massive optical computer being built could outpace quantum computers

New Scientist

The device, which is being built by Hiroyuki Tamura and colleagues at Japanese tech firm NTT, is specially designed to solve optimisation problems.


Apple at 40: Seeing promise in the 'blossoming' home computer market

PCWorld

When Apple launched the Apple II in 1977, it was still far from certain that consumers would want or need a home computer. While hobbyists were tinkering with computers they built and programmed themselves, Apple saw a need for something easier, and introduced the Apple II. This article, republished from the May 1, 1978, edition of Computerworld, sets the scene at the time and describes how a young Apple Computer was looking to the future. CUPERTINO, Calif.--As soon as low-cost computers were available in configurations designed for use by consumers, with programming features and language that non-technicians could use, the personal computing market began to grow rapidly, according to Apple Computer, Inc., one of the firms vying for a share of that blossoming market. With more than 100,000 units sold, the personal computer market is finally being recognized as much larger then the original hobby market, a spokesman stated, observing that there have already been forecasts of 2 billion in sales by 1985.


Apple at 40: Seeing promise in the 'blossoming' home computer market

PCWorld

When Apple launched the Apple II in 1977, it was still far from certain that consumers would want or need a home computer. While hobbyists were tinkering with computers they built and programmed themselves, Apple saw a need for something easier, and introduced the Apple II. This article, republished from the May 1, 1978, edition of Computerworld, sets the scene at the time and describes how a young Apple Computer was looking to the future. With more than 100,000 units sold, the personal computer market is finally being recognized as much larger then the original hobby market, a spokesman stated, observing that there have already been forecasts of 2 billion in sales by 1985. Apple, which introduced a self-contained personal computer (Apple II) in June 1977, believes the personal computer will make home life better for middle-income families.