How IBM Watson and AI is Changing Our Lives - The MSP Hub

#artificialintelligence

Last week I attended IBM (IBM) World of Watson as both a speaker and an attendee, and today as I sit in my neighborhood Starbucks (SBUX) thinking about everything, all I can say is WOW! This was one of the most interesting, inspiring and amazing events I have ever attended. And we are still in the very early stages of Watson, Cognitive and AI. I invite you to follow me as I learn more and write more about the wonderful world of Watson, all the companies that work with it and how it will change our industries, our businesses and our lives. As a wireless analyst and columnist, I come at this world of Watson from the wireless, telecom, internet and television angle.


Jeff Kagan: How IBM Watson and AI is Changing Our Lives

#artificialintelligence

Last week I attended IBM (IBM) World of Watson as both a speaker and an attendee, and today as I sit in my neighborhood Starbucks (SBUX) thinking about everything, all I can say is WOW! This was one of the most interesting, inspiring and amazing events I have ever attended. And we are still in the very early stages of Watson, Cognitive and AI. I invite you to follow me as I learn more and write more about the wonderful world of Watson, all the companies that work with it and how it will change our industries, our businesses and our lives. As a wireless analyst and columnist, I come at this world of Watson from the wireless, telecom, internet and television angle.


Tableau details its natural language query plans

ZDNet

Conversational interfaces with computers have been the talk of tech since the days of Star Trek. Mostly associated with voice response, frustrating experiences interacting with Siri, chatbots, or the interactive voice response (IVR) systems of call centers reveal what a long slog it's been for getting computers to understand natural language, regardless of whether it's in the form of voice or text. But it took the Amazon Echo's Alexa, which was designed as a conversational voice to Amazon's retail and entertainment services, to show that natural language interfaces could actually perform useful services. When we saw SAS founder Dr. James Goodnight demonstrate how Alexa could be used to query SAS Visual Analytics, we thought that was pretty cool. But when you look at this video, you'll realize that Alexa has only been taught a few things and has a long way to go before it will replace your keyboard or touchpad.


How to Build an Email Sentiment Analysis Bot: An NLP Tutorial

@machinelearnbot

Natural language processing technologies have become quite sophisticated over the past few years. From tech giants to hobbyists, many are rushing to build rich interfaces that can analyze, understand, and respond to natural language. Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana, Google's Google Home, and Apple's Siri all aim to change the way we interact with computers. Sentiment analysis, a subfield of natural language processing, consists of techniques that determine the tone of a text or speech. Today, with machine learning and large amounts of data harvested from social media and review sites, we can train models to identify the sentiment of a natural language passage with fair accuracy.


Is Google creating a voice-activated search engine for TODDLERS?

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google is potentially creating a search engine for toddlers, despite recent privacy scandals. The tech giant has filed a European patent, entitled Gamifying Voice Search Experience for Children, which gives it exclusive rights to develop the concept. Aimed at nursery-age youngsters, the prospective product would use a child-friendly bubble-interface to engage with infants. This would be separate to Google Assistant, which already allows people to conduct voice-activated searches on their devices. However, education experts have raised concerns over the risk of potential privacy violations, such as those associated with Amazon's Echo Device, plus the dangers of making children addicted to technology.