Five Lessons from AlphaGo's Historic Victory

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AlphaGo handily beat 18-time world Go champion Lee Sedol 4-1, and in doing so taught us several interesting lessons about where AI research is today, and where it is headed. One fascinating thing about AlphaGo is the unusual way it was designed. The software combined deep learning--the hottest AI technique out there today--with a much older, and far less fashionable, approach. Deep learning involves using very large simulated neural networks, and usually it eschews logic or symbol manipulation of the kind pioneered by the likes of Marvin Minksy and John McCarthy. But AlphaGo combines deep learning with something called tree-search, a technique invented by one of Minksy's contemporaries and colleagues, Claude Shannon.


AI Defeats European Champion At The Board Game Go: World Champion Lee Sedol Is Its Next Opponent

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Google's AlphaGo AI swept all of its five matches against European Go champion Fan Hui. Now, the team behind the deep-learning program is preparing for AlphaGo's upcoming match against world champion Lee Sedol in March. After soundly beating the reigning European Go champion, Google's AI computer is looking to go head-to-head with one of the best players in the world in a match set to be held in South Korea in March. Go, a board game that was invented in China some 2,500 years ago, involves having players alternately place white and black "stones" on a grid consisting of 19 vertical and 19 horizontal lines. The objective is to surround the stone pieces of the opponent without allowing a player's own pieces to be surrounded.


What Google's DeepMind Victory Really Means

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Microsoft is the world's most valuable company, with a 261 billion market cap. And an IBM computer named Deep Blue defeats Garry Kasparov, reigning world chess champion and, at the time, the highest-ranked chess player to have ever lived. Though it was not the first time man has lost to machine, it is perhaps the most prominent, highly publicized by IBM and widely covered by the global media. It was viewed as a milestone for AI, the true arrival of computer intelligence. The world celebrated the achievement of technology -- or offered doomsday predictions of a robot revolution.


What Google's DeepMind victory really means

#artificialintelligence

Microsoft is the world's most valuable company, with a 261 billion market cap. And an IBM computer named Deep Blue defeats Garry Kasparov, reigning world chess champion and, at the time, the highest-ranked chess player to have ever lived. Though it was not the first time man has lost to machine, it is perhaps the most prominent, highly publicized by IBM and widely covered by the global media. It was viewed as a milestone for AI, the true arrival of computer intelligence. The world celebrated the achievement of technology -- or offered doomsday predictions of a robot revolution.


Google AI in landmark victory over Go grandmaster

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When Gary Kasparov lost to chess computer Deep Blue in 1997, IBM marked a milestone in the history of artificial intelligence. On Wednesday, in a research paper released in Nature, Google earned its own position in the history books, with the announcement that its subsidiary DeepMind has built a system capable of beating the best human players in the world at the east Asian board game Go. Go, a game that involves placing black or white tiles on a 19x19 board and trying to remove your opponents', is far more difficult for a computer to master than a game such as chess. DeepMind's software, AlphaGo, successfully beat the three-time European Go champion Fan Hui 5–0 in a series of games at the company's headquarters in King's Cross last October. Dr Tanguy Chouard, a senior editor at Nature who attended the matches as part of the review process, described the victory as "really chilling to watch".