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Primitive dinosaurs learned to fly by accident when their useless wings flapped as they ran

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Mysteries of the evolution of flight have been unravelled by a life-sized replica of a feathered dinosaur. Chinese researchers created a model of the Caudipteryx, which was about the size of a peacock and was capable of running at 17mph (8m/s). They now believe the creature, which roamed modern-day China 130million years ago, learnt to fly by accident. Tests of the model found the theropod, which existed before dinosaurs evolved to be able to fly and glide through the air, inadvertently flapped its wings as it ran. Over the course of millennia the useless'proto-wings' transformed into full-fledged appendages capable of controlled flight, the researchers say.


Birds-flap-wings-actually-SAVE-energy.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

Researchers showed that jackdaws minimize their energy consumption when they lift off and fly because the feathers on their wing tips create several small vortices - a circular pattern of rotating air left behind a wing - instead of a single large one, which requires more energy. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered that the wingtips of jackdaw birds generate several small air vortices instead of one large vortex, as on an aeroplane with rectangular or elliptical wing tip. 'The wing tip generates several small air vortices instead of one large vortex, as on an aeroplane with rectangular or elliptical wing tips. According to the researchers, their finding that not only large gliders generate several small vortices around each wing tip could mean that wing tips with slotted feathers originally evolved to make flapping active flight more efficient.


Artificial Feathers Let This Robotic Bird Fly With Incredible Agility

#artificialintelligence

Over the years, Festo, a German automation company with a penchant for robots, has designed countless Mother Nature-inspired automatons that swim, hop, and fly like their real-world counterparts. That includes robotic birds, which have now been upgraded with fake feathers that allow the robots to soar through the air with the same maneuverability and agility as the real thing. Nine years ago, Festo revealed a robotic seagull with wings that could bend and flap like the wings on the real-life terrors of the beach. The robotic bird was able to stay aloft by simply flapping its wings without the need for an additional propeller or other thrust mechanism to create forward momentum. It could also steer by adjusting the angle of its tail, and while it was an engineering marvel, its in-air maneuverability was limited.


Artificial Feathers Let This Robotic Bird Fly With Incredible Agility – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Photo: FestoOver the years, Festo, a German automation company with a penchant for robots, has designed countless Mother Nature-inspired automatons that swim, hop, and fly like their real-world counterparts. That includes robotic birds, which have now been upgraded with fake feathers that allow the robots to soar through the air with the same maneuverability and agility as the real thing.AdvertisementNine years ago, Festo revealed a robotic seagull with wings that could bend and flap like the wings on the real-life terrors of the beach. The robotic bird was able to stay aloft by simply flapping its wings without the need for an additional propeller or other thrust mechanism to create forward momentum. It could also steer by adjusting the angle of its tail, and while it was an engineering marvel, its in-air maneuverability was limited.Gif: Festo (Other)AdvertisementThe latest version of Festo's robotic bird, BionicSwift, is a completely different story. One electric motor powers the flapping motion of the robot's wings, while two others make adjustments to the bird's …


Dark feathers give birds hot wings that may save energy during flight

New Scientist

Dark feathers may help birds fly more efficiently. They heat up the animals' wings and the surrounding air, which might help increase airflow over the wing. Svana Rogalla and her colleagues at the University of Ghent studied several bird species to see how the colour of feathers affects wing temperature during flight. They thermally imaged an osprey and found that dark feathers on the bird become warmer than light ones. To see how wing temperatures changed during flight, the team then used stuffed bird wings of different species in a wind tunnel, and heated them with infrared light bulbs similar in intensity to being outdoors on sunny and cloudy days.