NAFTA sides vow to seal quick deal as first round of U.S., Canada, Mexico talks wraps up

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The U.S., Mexico and Canada ended the first round of talks on a new North American Free Trade Agreement saying they're committed to wrapping up the negotiations quickly with a far-reaching deal. "While a great deal of effort and negotiation will be required in the coming months, Canada, Mexico and the United States are committed to an accelerated and comprehensive negotiation process that will upgrade our agreement and establish 21st century standards to the benefit of our citizens," the countries said in a statement Sunday, after five days of discussions in Washington. The next round of negotiations is scheduled for Sept. 1-5 in Mexico, with talks moving to Canada in late September and back to the U.S. in October. Additional rounds are being planned "for the remainder of the year," the countries said. The joint statement reinforces the notion that the three nations are seeking a quick deal before politics overtakes the agenda next year.


Guess who's the only British person on Time's person of the year shortlist

Mashable

Nigel Farage, the former leader of the Ukip party and prominent Leave campaigner in the Brexit referendum in June, has been shortlisted for Time magazine's person of the year award. Farage is one of the 11 contenders named by the U.S. publication alongside U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Beyoncé and Russian President Vladimir Putin. "As head of the U.K. Independence Party, Farage was a face of the successful campaign for Britain to leave the European Union, positioning the referendum as the start of a global populist wave against the political establishment," the magazine said. The other contenders are U.S. Olympic gymnast Simone Biles, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, residents of Flint, Michigan, who blew the whistle on lead-poisoned water and Russia's CRISPR scientists, who have developed technology that can edit DNA. Last year's winner was German Chancellor Angela Merkel.


Q&A: Texas Border Towns Hope NAFTA Can Be Saved, Revamped

U.S. News

Will the United States pull out of the 24-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico? Negotiators are working to rewrite the pact that President Donald Trump has called a job-killing "disaster." They met recently in Mexico City but couldn't reach a deal amid fears that Trump will withdraw from the agreement. Trump has also complicated matters by threatening to tax Mexican and Canadian steel and aluminum if he can't get the NAFTA deal he wants. The Associated Press spoke with Republican U.S. Rep. Will Hurd, who represents a south Texas district that has a big stake in strong trade ties to Mexico.


Economists: Michigan Economy Could Absorb NAFTA Changes

U.S. News

The economists say the effects would depend on whether Mexico and the U.S. place additional tariffs on each other's exports. They say Michigan could gain 6,400 jobs by 2020 due to more light truck production if there are no new tariffs, but could lose 7,000 manufacturing jobs if there are retaliatory tariffs.


Trump meeting with G-7 leaders after going on offensive

Associated Press

Leaders of the G7, from left, European Council President Donald Tusk, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Donald J. Trump, Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker pose during a group photo for the G7 summit in the Ancient Theatre of Taormina ( 3rd century BC) in the Sicilian citadel of Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. Leaders of the G7, from left, European Council President Donald Tusk, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Donald J. Trump, Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker pose during a group photo for the G7 summit in the Ancient Theatre of Taormina ( 3rd century BC) in the Sicilian citadel of Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. Leaders of the G7, from left, European Council President Donald Tusk, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Donald Trump, Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker pose during a group photo for the G7 summit in the Ancient Theatre of Taormina ( 3rd century BC) in the Sicilian citadel of Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. On Friday and Saturday, for the first time all seven are around the same table, including also newcomers Emmanuel Macron of France, Theresa May of Britain and the Italian host, Paolo Gentiloni, forging a new dynamic after a year of global political turmoil amid a rise in nationalism.