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12 cities to receive Justice Department aid to fight crime

PBS NewsHour

BETHESDA, Maryland -- The Justice Department says it will offer its resources to help 12 U.S. cities fight violent crime. The department said Tuesday it will help local authorities study crime patterns and come up with plans to reduce violence. Attorney General Jeff Sessions says officials will come up with "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time. The cities are: Birmingham, Alabama; Indianapolis, Indiana; Memphis, Tennessee; Toledo, Ohio; Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Buffalo, New York; Cincinnati, Ohio; Houston, Texas; Jackson, Tennessee; Kansas City, Missouri; Lansing, Michigan; and Springfield, Illinois. The department did not immediately explain how they were selected.


Fuji recalls sushi sold at Trader Joe's, 7 Eleven over listeria concerns

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 3 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Heads up, sushi fanatics: Fuji Food Products, Inc. has announced a recall of its ready-to-eat sushi – as well as spring rolls and salads – sold at Trader Joe's, 7 Eleven, Walgreens and more popular stores across the East Coast and the Upper Midwest over concerns the products are contaminated with listeria. Affected items were sold or distributed in various states, such as Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington D.C., West Virginia and Wisconsin. The products were also distributed to various stores, namely 7 Eleven, Walgreens, Food Lion, Hannaford, Trader Joe's, Giant Eagle Supermarkets, Porkys, Bozzutos, Supreme Lobster and Superior Foods, according to a recall notice posted the FDA's website.


APNewsBreak: Rusty patched bumblebee declared endangered

U.S. News

Today, only scattered populations remain in 13 states -- Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin -- and the Canadian province of Ontario. The bee's historic range and the number of observed colonies have plummeted by about 87 percent since the late 1990s.


Florida Eases Self-Driving Car Rules: Are States And Cities On The Hook For Mishaps?

#artificialintelligence

Jurisdictions might be on-the-hook for their self-driving car laws that allow autonomous cars and for which might get into mishaps or crashes. Florida just passed a law that widens the door for self-driving driverless cars to roam their public roadways and do so without any human back-up driver involved. Some see dangers afoot, others see progress and excitement. Ron DeSantis, governor of Florida, declared that by approving the new bill it showed that "Florida officially has an open-door policy to autonomous vehicle companies." There are now 29 states that have various driverless laws on their books, per the National Conference of State Legislatures: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New York, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin, plus Washington, D.C. Here's a question that some politicians and regulators are silently grappling with, albeit some think that they have the unarguably "right" answer and thusly have no need to lose sleep over the matter: Should states, counties, cities and townships be eagerly courting self-driving autonomous cars onto their public roadways, or should those jurisdictions be neutral about inviting them into their locales, or should they be highly questioning and require "proof until proven safe" before letting even one such autonomous car onto their turf?


Measles reported in 21 states, D.C., so far this year, CDC says

FOX News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that in 2018, 107 D.C. residents and people from multiple U.S. states have had the virus as of July 14. (REUTERS/LUCY NICHOLSON) More than 100 people and residents of almost two dozen states have contracted measles so far this year, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Wednesday. States that have had had measles cases this year include Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Washington. The outbreak is being monitored by the agency, Fox 59 reported, explaining that the better part of patients with the virus weren't vaccinated. The virus can be spread easily. "Measles virus can live for up to two hours in an airspace where the infected person coughed or sneezed," according to the CDC.