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Robots In EU Could Soon Be Recognized As 'Electronic Persons'

#artificialintelligence

Robots in Europe may soon be classified as "electronic persons" if the European Union adopts a recently submitted proposal. Owners of these robots would be liable to paying social security on each robot in an unprecedented step meant to address the rising presence of robotic workers in the EU. The proposal calls for "the creation of a European Agency for robotics and artificial intelligence in order to provide the technical, ethical and regulatory expertise." Robots are being used in exponentially greater numbers in factories and also taking on tasks ranging from surgery to manufacturing and even personal care. Robots are becoming so ubiquitous that there are growing fears over unemployment, wealth inequality and alienation.


Why Co-Parenting With Telepresence Robots Could Be a Fantastic Idea

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

This is a guest post. The views expressed here are solely those of the author and do not represent positions of IEEE Spectrum or the IEEE. There's always something heart-wrenching when parents have to be far away from their children. Maybe telepresence robots can help. This article explores some of the potential benefits and challenges of using telepresence robots as a co-parenting tool.


Why Co-Parenting With Telepresence Robots Could Be a Fantastic Idea

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

There's always something heart-wrenching when parents have to be far away from their children. Maybe telepresence robots can help. This article explores some of the potential benefits and challenges of using telepresence robots as a co-parenting tool. To my knowledge, there is only one research instance of this [pdf], so a lot of questions remain to be answered. What is clear is that there are reasons why co-parenting with telepresence robots could be a fantastic idea, and reasons that this could be terrible.


Do androids dream of aesthetic creep? Hail the robots of post-human art

#artificialintelligence

The androids have arrived, at least a century after modern art prophesied them. Artificial humans are advancing from the screens and pages of science fiction into our art galleries to look their flesh and blood cousins eerily in the eye. Artist Goshka Macuga, shortlisted for the Turner prize in 2008, has created a talking android for her latest exhibition at the Schinkel Pavillon in Berlin. It has black hair and bushy beard and talks philosophy: an intellectualtake on the Action Man toys I used to play with as a child. Macuga's robot has all the spooky uncanniness of a synthetic person with a realistically moulded face and bionic arms.


Briefly Noted Book Reviews

The New Yorker

This grandly retrospective novel warns of the political consequences of failures of personal insight. On Election Night, 2016, God visits the deathbed of Sam Cunningham, who, at the age of a hundred and fifteen, is the last living veteran of the First World War. God instructs him to narrate his life--"to live in your stories just as they felt in their own moment"--and we learn of a childhood in Louisiana, a stint as an Army sniper, marriage, family, and an illustrious career at a Chicago newspaper. Cunningham prides himself on his journalistic acumen but comes to realize that "I reported but I did not see"--remaining tragically oblivious of intimate truths about himself and those close to him. The narrator of this crisp début novel is a young Black British woman, the child of Jamaican immigrants, who has a lucrative job in finance, a new flat decorated with good art, and a posh boyfriend.