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Honda's humanoid disaster robot is designed to search through crumbled buildings

Mashable

In its secretive R&D department, Honda has been developing a bipedal disaster robot designed to climb through crumbled buildings. Honda unveiled the prototypical E2-DR robot last week at the 2017 International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems in Vancouver, reports IEEE Spectrum. As the Honda video shows, the E2-DR robot can climb ladders, ascend stairs, crawl through tight spaces, and manipulate its body to squeeze through cracks. SEE ALSO: Robotics expert Dr. Ross Mead reveals the truth about your favorite movie robots The five and a half-foot tall E2-DR is specifically designed to enter extreme environments that humans can't -- or shouldn't. According to Honda, these robots will act as first responders "in social infrastructures, such as plants," as they'll be mostly immune to toxic chemicals and noxious air.


'Flying fish' robot propels itself by shooting water out of its butt

#artificialintelligence

This illustration shows the combustion in side the robot propelling it out of the water. Engineers often look to nature for inspiration when creating robots. Just look at Astro the robot dog or the antelope-like SpaceBok. A team with the Aerial Robotics Laboratory at the Imperial College London in the UK has developed a floating robot that can shoot a jet of water out of its rear to propel itself through the air. The robot is shaped like a little airplane.


Invasion of the home robots

#artificialintelligence

The public narrative around home robotics is largely split between social and functional robots, which differ in the types of services offered and their potential impact on jobs and roles traditionally filled by humans. Functional robots (seen below left) are built to handle specific tasks--cleaning, cooking, gardening, and security, to name a few--and could drastically affect the domestic labor market. Coverage jumped in January 2018, when LG showcased three new concept robots: Serving Robot, Porter Robot, and Shopping Cart Robot at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2018. Quid also found articles that mentioned a robot that can climb walls to clean and sort tupperware, one that can show your home to potential renters, and a home monitor that tells you if your kids walk the dog. Social robots (below right) aim to meet your emotional needs and are developed to provide companionship, care, or instruction.


Learn to love robots, automation and artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Innovation expert Charles Leadbeater says people should not be frightened by AI's rise. For him, the danger of AI is that we'll become more like second-rate robots. He believes education needs to produces first-rate humans, able to work with robots.


Robot turns out to be man in suit

BBC News

A robot on show at a Russian state-sponsored event has turned out to be a man dressed in a costume. Robot Boris featured on Russian TV and was apparently able to walk, talk and dance. But soon after its appearance journalists began to question the bot's authenticity. In a picture published afterwards on social media, the neck of a person was clearly visible. The robot is in fact a 250,000 rouble (£2,975) costume called Alyosha the Robot, made by a company called Show Robots.