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Future of Artificial Intelligence - You May Question the Capabilities but Cannot Ignore

#artificialintelligence

In the current era, emerging technologies are capturing our interest. Upcoming enterprises are engaged in a race on business analytics, data science, machine intelligence, robotics, cryptocurrency, blockchain, Internet of Things, cybersecurity, augmented reality and much more. Autonomous vehicles, artificial intelligence, drones and virtual reality are trending topics of discussion. While GDPR gets enforced effectively on May 25 and we have concerns with cybersecurity, we can neither leave our addiction of smartphone nor stay away from social media. We can fathom the impact of technology when we see the changes in consumer behavior.


Magic Leap: Founder of Secretive Start-Up Unveils Mixed-Reality Goggles

@machinelearnbot

Magic Leap today revealed a mixed reality headset that it believes reinvents the way people will interact with computers and reality. Unlike the opaque diver's masks of virtual reality – which replace the real world with a virtual one – Magic Leap's device, called Lightwear, resembles goggles, which you can see through as if you're wearing a special pair of glasses. The goggles are tethered to a powerful pocket-sized computer, called the Lightpack, and can inject life-like moving and reactive people, robots, spaceships – anything – into a person's view of the real world.


Why This Futuristic Tech Will Be The Future of Computing

TIME - Tech

In the 25 years or so since I've been working on voice recognition projects, the technology has evolved a great deal. Today, all the major tech companies, from Apple to Google and beyond, are combining voice recognition with artificial intelligence software to create new platforms and interfaces for their users (think of Siri, Alexa or Cortana.) This kind of voice-activated innovation will continue to be important. But I believe a different technology will be even more significant: Augmented reality, or AR. Simply put, AR technology integrates virtual images and information with a user's real-world surroundings.


Google is boring now, and that's bad news for innovation

Mashable

Trust me, I never thought it would come to this. If you had asked me a week ago what I was expecting from Google's I/O developer conference, "boring" is not the word that would've come to mind. Yet, looking at this year's announcements, I'm struck most by how completely expected and, well, safe it all is. Sure, Google Lens was far and away the best thing Google previewed here, and a standalone VR headset is particularly enticing if you're a VR enthusiast (so far a pretty small, self-selecting group). SEE ALSO: Google's Assistant app for iOS is a clunky mess But none of that is exciting or especially innovative.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

#artificialintelligence

The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.