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HorseFly Drone Makes Real-Life Package Deliveries – DEEPAERODRONES – Medium

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One of the inventions of Workhorse Group, 'HorseFly' the truck-launched drone delivery is making real-life package deliveries to homes through a pilot program with the FAA and the city of Loveland, Ohio. The HorseFly system is designed to significantly lower the expense of last-mile delivery, says Workhorse. The system and its workings compile with the current FAA safety regulations for drone package delivery. How does the system work? "We feel this is a game-changing moment to innovate the way packages are delivered for many years to come," says Steve Burns, CEO of Workhorse.


How to deal with FAA drone regulations, according to Workhorse CEO Steve Burns

ZDNet

When the FAA finally released commercial drone regulations earlier this year, many executives were disappointed . The rules -- especially the requirement that pilots keep drones within their line of sight -- dampened dreams of commercial delivery services. Steve Burns, CEO of Workhorse, a company that specializes in electric delivery trucks, has an unusually optimistic view. With that in mind, Workhorse plans to start using drones to deliver packages at the end of August. They have already been testing the system with a Section 333 Exemption, and the next step is conforming to the FAA's new rules.


These drones see in the dark

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Workhorse Group Inc. of Loveland, Ohio, received permission Wednesday from the Federal Aviation Administration to begin testing a delivery drone nicknamed HorseFly that is launched from atop the company's electric trucks. SAN FRANCISCO – The world's largest drone maker has teamed up with the nation's largest thermal camera company to create ready-to-fly drones that can see in the dark. The drone maker is DJI, a China-based company that currently has about 70% of the world drone market. The camera is by FLIR Systems, a Wilsonville, Ore.-based thermal and infrared imaging company. The collaboration will produce drones that can be used in search-and-rescue, firefighting, security and surveillance.


These drones see in the dark

#artificialintelligence

Workhorse Group Inc. of Loveland, Ohio, received permission Wednesday from the Federal Aviation Administration to begin testing a delivery drone nicknamed HorseFly that is launched from atop the company's electric trucks. SAN FRANCISCO – The world's largest drone maker has teamed up with the nation's largest thermal camera company to create ready-to-fly drones that can see in the dark. The drone maker is DJI, a China-based company that currently has about 70% of the world drone market. The camera is by FLIR Systems, a Wilsonville, Ore.-based thermal and infrared imaging company. The collaboration will produce drones that can be used in search-and-rescue, firefighting, security and surveillance.


UPS tested launching a drone from a truck for deliveries

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

A Work Horse Group drone that docks on top of a UPS van being tested near Lithia, Florida. SAN FRANCISCO -- Both the drone industry and federal regulators are years away from actual legal drone deliveries in the United States. But that's not stopping companies from testing possibilities, both to get the visual of a drone with their logo out in front of the public and to see what works. UPS was the latest to try something new with drones on Tuesday when it ran a test of a truck-launched drone delivery system for rural areas in Lithia, Fla. The drone-equipped vans would only be used on rural routes, said Mark Wallace, senior vice president for global engineering and sustainability, UPS.