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Who Is Andy Puzder? Trump Labor Secretary Pick Can't Get A Confirmation Hearing Because Of Ethics Controversy

International Business Times

A confirmation hearing for President Donald Trump's Labor secretary pick, Andy Puzder, was was postponed this week a fourth time. The hearing was originally scheduled for Jan. 12, then Jan. 17, Feb. 2 and Feb. 7, and the new date hasn't yet been set. The reason for the delay: Puzder is having trouble meeting his ethics requirements, his spokesman George Thompson said Wednesday. Puzder is the CEO of fast food empire CKE Restaurants, Inc., which owns Hardee's and Carl's Jr. He's now attempting to divulge his assets in the company, and CKE has said that he would step down as CEO if confirmed. Puzder has been working on his ethics paperwork for the past three weeks.


Missouri Ethics Nominees: No Promises Made to Greitens

U.S. News

The governor nominated former Democratic state representative Wayne Henke and Republican retired financial analyst Bill Birkes to the ethics commission Friday. Concern that their nominations came at a price stemmed from Greitens' decision last year to stack the state Board of Education with people willing to fire the education commissioner.


Tillerson ethics plan foreshadows knotty Trump Cabinet confirmations

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – Rex Tillerson's disclosure that he stands to receive a $180 million cash payout from Exxon Mobil Corp. if he becomes the next U.S. secretary of state offers a preview of the thorny ethical questions that may be raised this week over a presidential Cabinet stacked with wealthy tycoons. And with confirmation hearings scheduled for Tillerson and eight other appointees of President-elect Donald Trump, the head of the federal office that helps ensure compliance with conflict-of-interest rules told lawmakers his agency is hard-pressed by too much work and too little time. Tillerson ironed out an agreement with the State Department under which Exxon would pay the cash into an independent trust for him, a move designed to separate his financial interests from the oil company that he led as chairman and CEO until he stepped down Jan. 1. Some compensation specialists question whether Exxon departed from its official compensation policies to extend its former leader a special arrangement; the company says it hasn't. Regardless, Tillerson's ethics filing last week foreshadows the complexity that will attend a busy week of hearings.


Tillerson ethics plan foreshadows knotty Trump Cabinet confirmations

The Japan Times

Rex Tillerson's disclosure that he stands to receive a $180 million cash payout from Exxon Mobil Corp. if he becomes the next U.S. secretary of state offers a preview of the thorny ethical questions that may be raised this week over a presidential Cabinet stacked with wealthy tycoons. And with confirmation hearings scheduled for Tillerson and eight other appointees of President-elect Donald Trump, the head of the federal office that helps ensure compliance with conflict-of-interest rules told lawmakers his agency is hard-pressed by too much work and too little time. Tillerson ironed out an agreement with the State Department under which Exxon would pay the cash into an independent trust for him, a move designed to separate his financial interests from the oil company that he led as chairman and chief executive officer until he stepped down Jan. 1. Some compensation specialists question whether Exxon departed from its official compensation policies to extend its former leader a special arrangement; the company says it hasn't. Regardless, Tillerson's ethics filing last week foreshadows the complexity that will attend a busy week of hearings.


Ethics agency has 'great concern' about Trump nominees' schedule, lack of information

PBS NewsHour

President-elect Donald Trump delivered brief remarks to reporters at the Mar-a-lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida in December. The independent Office of Government Ethics is expressing "great concern" that several of President-elect Donald Trump's cabinet nominees have not yet completed the required ethics review process or even filed any financial information but face confirmation hearings in the next week. The concerns came in a Friday letter from Walter Shaub, the director of the Office of Government Ethics, who was responding to questions from top Democrats in the Senate. Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer released the letter Saturday. "The announced hearing schedule for several nominees who have not completed the ethics review process is of great concern to me," Shaub wrote.