US appeals court says Tinder Plus pricing is discriminatory

Engadget

They say all's fair in love and war, but those that have used Tinder will probably disagree. And that includes Allan Candelore, a man suing the dating app over the pricing of its premium service, Tinder Plus. Candelore and his lawyers argue that charging $9.99 a month to users under 30, and $19.99 a month to those over 30, is age discrimination, and violates two California laws: the Unruh Civil Rights Act and the Unfair Competition Law.


Artificial intelligence won't save the internet from porn

Engadget

"I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description ["hard-core pornography"], and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it, and the motion picture involved in this case is not that." In 1964, the Supreme Court overturned an obscenity conviction against Nico Jacobellis, a Cleveland theater manager accused of distributing obscene material. The film in question was Louis Malle's "The Lovers," starring Jeanne Moreau as a French housewife who, bored with her media-mogul husband and her polo-playing sidepiece, packs up and leaves after a hot night with a younger man. And by "hot," I mean a lot of artful blocking, heavy breathing and one fleeting nipple -- basically, nothing you can't see on cable TV.


Huawei is 'open' to selling its 5G modems, but only to Apple

Engadget

For years, Huawei has been developing its own high-powered processors and modems, all to power its big portfolio of mobile devices. And so far, the company has refused to sell any of those to its competitors. We've learned, however, that the company might be softening that stance. A source with knowledge of the situation has confirmed to Engadget that Huawei is now "open" to selling its 5G Balong 5000 chipsets, but only to one company: Apple. Such a deal would be unusual, to say the least.


Qualcomm must license chip patents to rival companies, court rules

ZDNet

Qualcomm has been ordered to make patents essential for modern modem chips available to rival companies. On Tuesday in the US District Court for the Northern District of California, Judge Lucy Koh granted a partial summary judgment against Qualcomm which was requested by the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC). This requires Qualcomm to open up some of its portfolio of essential patents to rival companies such as Intel. The intellectual property in question relates to some of the US chip maker's patents which protect core technologies essential for chips which permit mobile devices to connect to wireless systems. The judgment was made as part of an antitrust lawsuit levied against Qualcomm by the FTC.


Facing sexism charges, Uber says Eric Holder will investigate

PCWorld

Uber Technologies scrambled on Monday to counter the sexism charges raised by a former employee, and said it would appoint former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to the panel that would investigate allegations by the engineer that the company mishandled her complaint of sexual harassment. The company, which did not release diversity data when asked by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson, also said Monday that 15.1 percent of its employees in engineering, product management, and scientist roles are women and this has not changed substantively in the last year. In an email to employees that was also circulated to media, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick wrote that he and Liane Hornsey, chief human resources officer, will be working to publish a broader diversity report for Uber in the coming months. In her blog post, the engineer, Susan J. Fowler, has said that there had been an exodus of women in the group she worked in because of the discrimination against women and politics in the upper management, resulting in women constituting 3 percent of the 150 site reliability engineers at the time of her quitting her job in December last year from 25 percent in November 2015 when she joined Uber. Holder and his partner Tammy Albarran at the law firm Covington & Burling will be joined by Arianna Huffington, who sits on Uber's board, Hornsey, and Angela Padilla, the company's associate general counsel for an "independent review into the specific issues relating to the work place environment" raised by Fowler, Kalanick wrote.