Go champion Lee Sedol scores first win against Google's DeepMind AlphaGo AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A human Go player has scored his first victory over an artificial intelligence computer program after'finding weaknesses' in the software. Google's AlphaGo computer had previously managed to win three games against Go world champion Lee Sedol in the five game match. This meant the company's DeepMind artificial intelligence program won the 1 million ( 706,388) prize for the match. South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol puts the first stone against Google's artificial intelligence program (pictured), which he later went on to win in 180 moves. On Saturday Facebook chief executive Marc Zuckerberg, who is developing his own AI personal assistant technology, congratulated the Google team on their victory.


Google's AI beats human champion at Go

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In what they called a milestone achievement for artificial intelligence, scientists said on Wednesday they have created a computer program that beat a professional human player at the complex board game called Go, which originated in ancient China. The feat recalled IBM supercomputer Deep Blue's 1997 match victory over chess world champion Garry Kasparov. But Go, a strategy board game most popular in places like China, South Korea and Japan, is vastly more complicated than chess. "Go is considered to be the pinnacle of game AI research," said artificial intelligence researcher Demis Hassabis of Google DeepMind, the British company that developed the AlphaGo program. "It's been the grand challenge, or holy grail if you like, of AI since Deep Blue beat Kasparov at chess."


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Los Angeles Times

A computer defeated China's top player of the ancient board game go on Tuesday, earning praise that it might have finally surpassed human abilities in one of the last games machines have yet to dominate. AlphaGo has improved markedly since it defeated South Korea's top competitor last year and is a "completely different player," Ke told reporters. Last year, it defeated South Korea's Lee Sedol. Four takeaways from AlphaGo's victory over a world champion Go player How a human Go champion finally beat Google's artificial intelligence machine


Artificial intelligence: Go master Lee Se-dol wins against AlphaGo program - BBC News

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A master player of the game Go has won his first match against a Google computer program, after losing three in a row in a best-of-five competition. Lee Se-dol, one of the world's top players, said his win against AlphaGo was "invaluable". The Chinese board game is considered to be a much more complex challenge for a computer than chess, and AlphaGo's wins were seen as a landmark moment for artificial intelligence. Go is a game of two players who take turns putting black or white stones on a 19-by-19 grid. Players win by taking control of the most territory on the board.


AlphaGo emerges victorious in human vs AI Go battle

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AlphaGo has won the fifth of five games of Go against South Korean grandmaster Lee Se-dol. The final game was a close-run thing, spilling into overtime with the AI just half-a-point ahead at one stage. The best-of-five tournament, which saw the software win 4-1, is considered to be a significant moment in the development of artificial intelligence. Go is a sophisticated game with more potential moves than there are atoms in the observable universe, requiring a greater capacity for on-the-fly "thinking". In a post on Google's Asia-Pacific blog, top American go player Michael Redmond said: "It was difficult to say at what point AlphaGo was ahead or behind, a close game throughout.