Artificial intelligence-based algorithm for intensive care of traumatic brain injury

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A recent Finnish study published in Scientific Reports presents the first artificial intelligence (AI)-based algorithm designed for use in intensive care units for treating patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The project is a collaborative project between three Finnish university hospitals: Helsinki University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital and Turku University Hospital. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant global cause of mortality and morbidity with an increasing incidence, especially in low-and-middle income countries. The most severe TBIs are treated in intensive care units (ICU), but in spite of the proper and high-quality care, about one in three patients dies. Patients that suffer from severe TBI are unconscious, which makes it challenging to accurately monitor the condition of the patient during intensive care.


Machine Learning Algorithm For Traumatic Brain injury Intensive Care

#artificialintelligence

A collaborative project between three Finnish university hospitals has developed the first artificial intelligence (AI)-based algorithm designed for use in intensive care units for treating patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant global cause of mortality and morbidity with an increasing incidence, especially in low-and-middle income countries. The most severe TBIs are treated in intensive care units (ICU), but in spite of the proper and high-quality care, about one in three patients dies. Patients that suffer from severe TBI are unconscious, which makes it challenging to accurately monitor the condition of the patient during intensive care. In the ICU, many tens of variables are continuously monitored (e.g.


Bush ready to leave intensive care, wife Barbara goes home

Associated Press

Bush and his wife, Barbara Bush, speak at a college basketball game in Houston. Barbara Bush was discharged from Houston Methodist Hospital Monday, Jan. 23, 2017, while her husband is expected to be moved from the hospital's intensive care unit soon. Bush and his wife, Barbara Bush, speak at a college basketball game in Houston. Barbara Bush was discharged from Houston Methodist Hospital Monday, Jan. 23, 2017, while her husband is expected to be moved from the hospital's intensive care unit soon.


How big data can change intensive care

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A team of data scientists, researchers and clinicians from UNSW Sydney have won a major prize at the second annual Healthcare Artificial Intelligence Datathon held at the National University of Singapore (NUS). The two-day event – organised jointly by the National University Health System (NUHS), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and NUS – hosted more than 200 local and international data scientists and clinicians last weekend to address current problems in healthcare with the latest machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies. The joint UNSW-NUS team won first prize in the Critical Care Track, competing against eight other teams to analyse clinical data contained in the MIT/Philips eICU Collaborative Research Database, comprising information on more than 200,000 patients treated in intensive care units in US hospitals over the past five years. The UNSW-NUS team included researchers Oluwadamisola Sotade, Dr Mark Hanly and Oisin Fitzgerald from UNSW's Centre for Big Data Research in Health, Dr Tim Churches, data scientist from the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research and UNSW South Western Sydney Clinical School, and Dr Peter Straka from UNSW Mathematics and Statistics. "The installation of next-generation electronic medical records systems in ICUs and throughout hospitals enable very sophisticated machine-learning and artificial intelligence algorithms to be developed to assist busy clinicians in patient care and treatment decision making." said Dr Churches.


'SEE YOU IN HEAVEN' Mom who chose baby over chemo dies days after birth

FOX News

A Michigan woman who chose to forego cancer treatments that would have prolonged her life but ended her pregnancy died Saturday, three days after giving birth to her sixth child. "I'll see you in Heaven," Nick DeKlyen said to his wife just before she died. "We stayed by her until she took her last breath," he said. The 37-year-old woman died surrounded by family at University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor. She had been in a coma since July and gave birth to a baby girl via emergency cesarean section on Wednesday.